poem


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Related to poem: Love poem

po·em

 (pō′əm)
n.
1. A verbal composition designed to convey experiences, ideas, or emotions in a vivid and imaginative way, characterized by the use of language chosen for its sound and suggestive power and by the use of literary techniques such as meter, metaphor, and rhyme.
2. A composition in verse rather than in prose: wrote both prose and poems.
3. A literary composition written with an intensity or beauty of language more characteristic of poetry than of prose.

[French poème, from Old French, from Latin poēma, from Greek poiēma, from poiein, to create; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

poem

(ˈpəʊɪm)
n
1. (Poetry) a composition in verse, usually characterized by concentrated and heightened language in which words are chosen for their sound and suggestive power as well as for their sense, and using such techniques as metre, rhyme, and alliteration
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a literary composition that is not in verse but exhibits the intensity of imagination and language common to it: a prose poem.
3. anything resembling a poem in beauty, effect, etc
[C16: from Latin poēma, from Greek, variant of poiēma something composed, created, from poiein to make]

po•em

(ˈpoʊ əm)

n.
1. a composition in verse, esp. one characterized by a highly developed form and the use of heightened language and rhythm to express an imaginative interpretation of the subject.
2. something having qualities that are suggestive of or likened to those of poetry.
[1540–50; < Latin poēma < Greek poíēma poem, something made =poiē-, variant s. of poieîn to make + -ma resultative n. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poem - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical linespoem - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
line of poetry, line of verse - a single line of words in a poem
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
abecedarius - a poem having lines beginning with letters of the alphabet in regular order
Alcaic, Alcaic verse - verse in the meter used in Greek and Latin poetry consisting of strophes of 4 tetrametric lines; reputedly invented by Alcaeus
ballad, lay - a narrative poem of popular origin
ballade - a poem consisting of 3 stanzas and an envoy
blank verse - unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter)
elegy, lament - a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
epic, epic poem, heroic poem, epos - a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
free verse, vers libre - unrhymed verse without a consistent metrical pattern
haiku - an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
rondel, rondeau - a French verse form of 10 or 13 lines running on two rhymes; the opening phrase is repeated as the refrain of the second and third stanzas
sonnet - a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme
tanka - a form of Japanese poetry; the 1st and 3rd lines have five syllables and the 2nd, 4th, and 5th have seven syllables
terza rima - a verse form with a rhyme scheme: aba bcb cdc, etc.
rhyme, verse - a piece of poetry
canto - a major division of a long poem
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
versicle - a short verse said or sung by a priest or minister in public worship and followed by a response from the congregation
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)

poem

noun verse, song, lyric, rhyme, sonnet, ode, verse composition a tender autobiographical poem set to music
Quotations
"A poem should not mean"
"but be" [Archibald McLeish Ars Poetica]

poem

noun
1. A poetic work or poetic works:
2. Something likened to poetry, as in form or style:
Translations
قَصِّيدَةقَصيدَه
báseň
digt
runo
pjesmapoema
költeményvers
puisi
ljóðljóî
詩歌詩的表現
eilėraštispoema
dzejolispoēma
báseň
pesempoezija
diktpoem
บทกวี
bài thơ

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] N (short) → poesía f; (long, narrative) → poema m
Lorca's poemslas poesías de Lorca, la obra poética de Lorca

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] npoème m

poem

nGedicht nt; epic poemEpos nt

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] npoesia

poem

(ˈpouim) noun
a piece of writing arranged in lines which usually have a regular rhythm and often rhyme.

poem

قَصِّيدَة báseň digt Gedicht ποίημα poema runo poème pjesma poesia gedicht dikt wiersz poema поэма dikt บทกวี şiir bài thơ
References in classic literature ?
Yet, in saying this, I do but indirectly burnish a little brighter the noble merit of the poem and the poet.
But as I was crowded for space, and wished the other parts of my body to remain a blank page for a poem I was then composing --at least, what untattooed parts might remain --I did not trouble myself with the odd inches; nor, indeed, should inches at all enter into a congenial admeasurement of the whale.
It was like a wonderful poem to him, and he took it all in guilelessly--even to the conspicuous signs demanding immaculate cleanliness of the employees.
1] "Weep Not for Those," a poem by Thomas Moore (1779-1852).
If I were at home, no doubt I could get a translation of this poem, but I am abroad and can't; therefore I will make a translation myself.
There were very few there who knew what "tete" meant, but the poem was very satisfactory, nevertheless.
She had taught Elijah and Elisha Simpson so that they recited three verses of something with such comical effect that they delighted themselves, the teacher, and the school; while Susan, who lisped, had been provided with a humorous poem in which she impersonated a lisping child.
You will have my sketches, some time or other, to look ator my tour to reador my poem.
Her innocent white muslin apron was a little domestic poem in itself.
The noise in this room was perfectly tumultuous, for there were more children there, than Scrooge in his agitated state of mind could count; and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves like one, but every child was conducting itself like forty.
It is a solemn thought,--and the finest poem that was ever written came out of a grey pulpy mass such as we make brain sauce of.
This very curious poem, long a desideratum in Scottish literature,