poesy


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Related to poesy: verdurous

po·e·sy

 (pō′ĭ-zē, -sē)
n. pl. po·e·sies
1. Poetical works; poetry.
2. The art or practice of composing poems.

[Middle English poesie, from Old French, from Latin poēsis, from Greek poiēsis, from poiein, to create; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

poesy

(ˈpəʊɪzɪ)
n, pl -sies
1. (Poetry) an archaic word for poetry
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) poetic the art of writing poetry
3. (Poetry) archaic or poetic a poem or verse, esp one used as a motto
[C14: via Old French from Latin poēsis, from Greek, from poiēsis poetic art, creativity, from poiein to make]

po•e•sy

(ˈpoʊ ə si, -zi)

n., pl. -sies.
1. poetry.
2. Archaic.
a. a poem or verse used as a motto.
b. a poem.
[1300–50; Middle English poesie < Middle French < Latin poēsis < Greek poíēsis fabrication, poetic art; see poet, -sis]

poesy

1. Archaic. poetry.
2. Obsolete, a poem.
See also: Verse

Poesy

 poems collectively, c. 1300; a bunch of flowers; a nosegay, 1572.
Example: poesy of flowers, 1629.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poesy - literature in metrical formpoesy - literature in metrical form    
hush, stillness, still - (poetic) tranquil silence; "the still of the night"
epos - a body of poetry that conveys the traditions of a society by treating some epic theme
literary genre, writing style, genre - a style of expressing yourself in writing
epic poetry, heroic poetry - poetry celebrating the deeds of some hero
dolor, dolour - (poetry) painful grief
Erin - an early name of Ireland that is now used in poetry
lyric - write lyrics for (a song)
relyric - write new lyrics for (a song)
rhyme, rime - compose rhymes
tag - supply (blank verse or prose) with rhymes
alliterate - use alliteration as a form of poetry
poetise, poetize, verse, versify - compose verses or put into verse; "He versified the ancient saga"
metrify - compose in poetic meter; "The bard metrified his poems very precisely"
spondaise, spondaize - make spondaic; "spondaize verses"
elegise, elegize - compose an elegy
sonnet - compose a sonnet
sonnet - praise in a sonnet
scan - conform to a metrical pattern
lyric - of or relating to a category of poetry that expresses emotion (often in a songlike way); "lyric poetry"
sweet, sweetly - in an affectionate or loving manner (`sweet' is sometimes a poetic or informal variant of `sweetly'); "Susan Hayward plays the wife sharply and sweetly"; "how sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank"- Shakespeare; "talking sweet to each other"

poesy

noun
A poetic work or poetic works:
Translations

poesy

n (form: = poetry) → Lyrik f, → Poesie f (old)
References in classic literature ?
Some of the effects are very daring, approaching even to the boldest flights of the rococo, the sirocco, and the Byzantine schools--yet the master's hand never falters--it moves on, calm, majestic, confident--and, with that art which conceals art, it finally casts over the TOUT ENSEMBLE, by mysterious methods of its own, a subtle something which refines, subdues, etherealizes the arid components and endures them with the deep charm and gracious witchery of poesy.
Such ruin and desolation cast a weird poesy on the scene, filling the souls of the spectators with dreamy thoughts.
Certain persons who talk much of poesy and know nothing about it, declaim against the habits of life in the provinces.
and poesy, with eyes of fascination, smiles of love, and bright and flowing hair.
There, night and day, will I gaze upon it; my soul shall drink its radiance; it shall be diffused throughout my intellectual powers, and gleam brightly in every line of poesy that I indite.
In such lines we can perceive not one of those higher attributes of Poesy which belong to her in all circumstances and throughout all time.
And yet there is something mysteriously grand, like thought, in it; genius and death are there; Diana and Apollo beside a skull or skeleton, beauty and destruction, poesy and reality, colors glowing in the shadows, often a whole drama, motionless and silent.
One of the fathers, in great severity, called poesy vinum daemonum, because it fireth the imagination; and yet, it is but with the shadow of a lie.
And through all his days to the last one of them, he considered the whole matter a pleasant fancy, all poesy of sentiment, on Villa's part.
She had never been tormented by womanhood, and she had lived in a dreamland of Tennysonian poesy, dense even to the full significance of that delicate master's delicate allusions to the grossnesses that intrude upon the relations of queens and knights.
The chronicler of passing events sat through it, motionless, with suspended pen; and when the movement was complete Poesy was represented in that place by nothing but a warm spot on the wooden chair.
The world that the traveller has lately viewed is here in miniature, modest and pure; his soul, refreshed, bids him remain where a charm of melody and poesy surrounds him with harmony and awakens ideas within his mind.