poet


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po·et

 (pō′ĭt)
n.
1. A writer of poems.
2. One who is especially gifted in the perception and expression of the beautiful or lyrical: "[He] was the bard of the bird feeder, the poet of the small and homey" (Bill McKibben).

[Middle English, from Old French poete, from Latin poēta, from Greek poiētēs, maker, composer, from poiein, to create; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

poet

(ˈpəʊɪt) or sometimes when feminine

poetess

n
1. (Poetry) a person who writes poetry
2. a person with great imagination and creativity
[C13: from Latin poēta, from Greek poiētēs maker, poet, from poiein to make]

po•et

(ˈpoʊ ɪt)

n.
1. one who writes poetry.
2. one who displays imagination and sensitivity along with eloquent expression.
[1250–1300; Middle English poete < Latin poēta < Greek poiētḗs poet, literally, maker =poiē-, variant s. of poieîn to make + -tēs agent n. suffix]
po′et•like`, adj.

poet.

1. poetic.
2. poetry.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poet - a writer of poems (the term is usually reserved for writers of good poetry)poet - a writer of poems (the term is usually reserved for writers of good poetry)
bard - a lyric poet
elegist - the author of a mournful poem lamenting the dead
odist - a poet who writes odes
poetess - a woman poet
poet laureate - the poet officially appointed to the royal household in Great Britain; "the poet laureate is expected to provide poems for great national occasions"
poet laureate - a poet who is unofficially regarded as holding an honorary position in a particular group or region; "she is the poet laureate of all lyricists"; "he is the poet laureate of Arkansas"
sonneteer - a poet who writes sonnets
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)

poet

noun bard, rhymer, lyricist, lyric poet, versifier, maker (archaic), elegist the English poet William Blake see poetry
Quotations
"The poet is the priest of the invisible" [Wallace Stevens Adagia]
"A poet's hope: to be,"
"like some valley cheese,"
"local, but prized elsewhere" [W.H. Auden Shorts II]
"For that fine madness still he did retain"
"Which rightly should possess a poet's brain" [Michael Drayton To Henry Reynolds, of Poets and Poesy]
"Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal" [T.S. Eliot The Sacred Wood]
"The poet is always indebted to the universe, paying interest and fines on sorrow" [Vladimir Mayakovsky Conversation with an Inspector of Taxes about Poetry]
"All a poet can do today is warn" [Wilfred Owen Poems (preface)]
"Sir, I admit your general rule"
"That every poet is a fool;"
"But you yourself may serve to show it,"
"That every fool is not a poet" [Alexander Pope Epigram from the French]

poet

noun
One who writes poetry:
Translations
básník-řka
digterpoet
runoilija
pjesnikpjesnikinja
költõköltőpoéta
ljóðskáldljóîskáldskáld
詩人
시인
poetaspoetinispoetiškaipoetiškaspoeto gyslelė
dzejnieks
കവി
básnik
pesnik
poet
กวี
nhà thơ

poet

[ˈpəʊɪt]
A. Npoeta mf
B. CPD poet laureate N (poets laureate (pl)) → poeta mf laureado/a
POET LAUREATE
El poeta de la Corte, denominado Poet Laureate, ocupa un puesto vitalicio al servicio de la Casa Real británica. Era tradición que escribiera poemas conmemorativos para ocasiones oficiales, aunque hoy día esto es poco frecuente. El primer poeta así distinguido fue Ben Jonson, en 1616.

poet

[ˈpəʊɪt] npoète m

poet

nDichter m, → Poet m (old) ? poet laureate

poet

[ˈpəʊɪt] npoeta/essa

poet

(ˈpouit) feminine ˈpoet ~ˈpoetess noun
a person who writes poems.
poetic (pouˈetik) adjective
of, like, or suitable for, a poem. a poetic expression.
poˈetically adverb
ˈpoetry noun
1. poems in general. He writes poetry.
2. the art of composing poems. Poetry comes naturally to some people.

poet

شاعِر básník digter Dichter ποιητής poeta runoilija poète pjesnik poeta 詩人 시인 dichter dikter poeta poeta поэт poet กวี şair nhà thơ 诗人
References in classic literature ?
Perhaps our talking of them will arouse the poet who will tell the hidden wonder story of the influence for which the hands were but fluttering pennants of promise.
I believe that Gaston Cleric narrowly missed being a great poet, and I have sometimes thought that his bursts of imaginative talk were fatal to his poetic gift.
They chatted incessantly: about the things around them; their amusing adventure out in the water-it had again assumed its entertaining aspect; about the wind, the trees, the people who had gone to the Cheniere; about the children playing croquet under the oaks, and the Farival twins, who were now performing the overture to "The Poet and the Peasant.
It would seem long practice had rendered this manual accompaniment necessary; for it did not cease until the preposition which the poet had selected for the close of his verse had been duly delivered like a word of two syllables.
Because, probably, at his highest elevation, the poet needs no human intercourse; but he finds it dreary to descend, and be a stranger.
Why did the poor poet of Tennessee, upon suddenly receiving two handfuls of silver, deliberate whether to buy him a coat, which he sadly needed, or invest his money in a pedestrian trip to Rockaway Beach?
The Christian is composed by the belief of a wise, all-ruling Father, whose presence fills the void unknown with light and order; but to the man who has dethroned God, the spirit-land is, indeed, in the words of the Hebrew poet, "a land of darkness and the shadow of death," without any order, where the light is as darkness.
There the poet sustains himself merely by his own superfluous fat, and the philosopher comes down on his marrow-bones.
I knew how she feels, and that there is no other satisfied ambition, whether of king, conqueror, or poet, that ever reaches half-way to that serene far summit or yields half so divine a con- tentment.
She reveled in the impassioned appeal of the poet, and implored the ruthless woodman to be as brutal as possible with the axe, so that she might properly put greater spirit into her lines.
They are, in the language of the slave's poet, Whittier,--
A poet in love must be encouraged in both capacities, or neither.