poetaster


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po·et·as·ter

 (pō′ĭt-ăs′tər)
n.
A writer of insignificant, meretricious, or shoddy poetry.

[New Latin poētaster : Latin poēta, poet; see poet + Latin -aster, pejorative suff.]

poetaster

(ˌpəʊɪˈtæstə; -ˈteɪ-)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of inferior verse
[C16: from Medieval Latin; see poet, -aster]

po•et•as•ter

(ˈpoʊ ɪtˌæs tər)

n.
an inferior poet; a writer of indifferent verse.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin or New Latin; see poet, -aster1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

poetaster

noun
One who writes poetry:
Translations

poetaster

[ˌpəʊɪˈtæstəʳ] Npoetastro m

poetaster

n (pej)Poetaster m, → Dichterling m
References in classic literature ?
This is an example of a class of writing which may be passed over too lightly by those whom poetasters have made distrustful of poetry.
For examples of the latter, in a climactic sequence in Poetaster (1601) Crispinus vomits chunks of Marston's vocabulary to the accompaniment of multiple Os--first four, then two, then three more (5.
Everyman in his Humor (1598) 30 ohs/119 Os Everyman Out of his Humor (1600) 12 ohs/231 Os Poetaster (1602) 22 ohs/229 Os Sejanus (1603) No ohs/60 Os Volpone (1605-6) 12 ofts/87 Os Epicoene (1609) No ohs/l 17 Os Catiline (1611) No ohs/99 Os The Alchemist (1612) No o/is/199 Os Bartholomew Faire (1614) No ohs/l 16 Os
As far as affixes are concerned, Jonson's use of the Latin suffix -aster in grammaticaster and poetaster is noteworthy.
Other chapters uncover connections between George Puttenham's The Arte of English Poesie and sugar, Ben Jonson's Poetaster and inkhorn terms, Shakespeare's The Rape of Lucrece and the lately introduced concept of zero.
The extraordinary beauty of The Mastersingers has been overshadowed, however--really from its first performances--by Wagner's characterization of Beckmesser, a poetaster and scoundrel whom many have seen as an anti-Semitic caricature, and by Hans Sachs's stirring public exhortation to revere "Holy German Art," which has more recently acquired the taint of monstrous German chauvinism.
As asserted by al-Khafaji in disapproval, both the anonymous poet (or rather, poetaster.
Contemporary allusions to country players tend to be derogative, characterising them as comically unsophisticated, or as crudely simple, as in Ben Jonson's Poetaster, where Tucca describes the strolling country player as one who stalks "vpon boords and / barrel heads to an old crackt trumpet" (3.
Jonson's Poetaster (1601; printed 1602) comments on masques in a similar way.
In 1601, he offended the world at large by putting himself into his play The Poetaster as the poet Horace, beleaguered by nonentities, and he offended the government again--if Donaldson is right--by implying support for the earl of Essex, lately executed for treason.
Still today drawing on the essential details of the ancient libel are England's "anti-Zionist" versions of the ancient hailed, such as the versified eruption of Oxford poetaster Tom Paulin about alleged child murder by Israeli soldiers and the ten-minute play by Caryl Churchill entitled Seven Jewish Children--A Play for Gaza (2009).