poetaster


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po·et·as·ter

 (pō′ĭt-ăs′tər)
n.
A writer of insignificant, meretricious, or shoddy poetry.

[New Latin poētaster : Latin poēta, poet; see poet + Latin -aster, pejorative suff.]

poetaster

(ˌpəʊɪˈtæstə; -ˈteɪ-)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of inferior verse
[C16: from Medieval Latin; see poet, -aster]

po•et•as•ter

(ˈpoʊ ɪtˌæs tər)

n.
an inferior poet; a writer of indifferent verse.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin or New Latin; see poet, -aster1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

poetaster

noun
One who writes poetry:
Translations

poetaster

[ˌpəʊɪˈtæstəʳ] Npoetastro m

poetaster

n (pej)Poetaster m, → Dichterling m
References in classic literature ?
This is an example of a class of writing which may be passed over too lightly by those whom poetasters have made distrustful of poetry.
Other chapters uncover connections between George Puttenham's The Arte of English Poesie and sugar, Ben Jonson's Poetaster and inkhorn terms, Shakespeare's The Rape of Lucrece and the lately introduced concept of zero.
As asserted by al-Khafaji in disapproval, both the anonymous poet (or rather, poetaster.
Contemporary allusions to country players tend to be derogative, characterising them as comically unsophisticated, or as crudely simple, as in Ben Jonson's Poetaster, where Tucca describes the strolling country player as one who stalks "vpon boords and / barrel heads to an old crackt trumpet" (3.
Jonson's Poetaster (1601; printed 1602) comments on masques in a similar way.
Still today drawing on the essential details of the ancient libel are England's "anti-Zionist" versions of the ancient hailed, such as the versified eruption of Oxford poetaster Tom Paulin about alleged child murder by Israeli soldiers and the ten-minute play by Caryl Churchill entitled Seven Jewish Children--A Play for Gaza (2009).
New York Times economic poetaster Paul Krugman said the small nation had been "hijacked by a combination of free-market ideology and crony capitalism.
A poetaster Zabihullah told Afghan Islamic Press (AIP) that people, who allegedly showed negligence into the attack, should also be put on trial.
In quick succession I've just watched (and heard) R S Thomas reading A Welsh Landscape, Ted Hughes reading from Crow, Sheenagh Pugh, Simon Armitage, Tony Curtis (all three of them, the film star, the Irish poetaster and the genuine Welsh original), Ifor Thomas and Lloyd Robson.
Most of all, however, The Monster Loves His Labyrinth identifies its author as a vital member of an international, ever-dwindling club of secular humanists, that worldly, cosmopolitan, mildly hedonistic, fiercely agnostic generation of writers for whom a devotion to the arts is both a religious and political calling, and whose bitter experience of Cold War-era ideology has led them to approach the hack journalist and the starry-eyed poetaster with equal derision.
As Cathcart argues in his close reading of this brief and nondescript poem, Weever probably infuriated Jonson by casting him as Marston's "junior partner" (43) and by visualizing Marston, not Jonson, as a type of Horace, a role Jonson coveted for himself and memorialized in his stage depiction of himself as Horace in Poetaster.
of Jonson's Poetaster, she shows how "the poet becomes a sort