poetaster

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po·et·as·ter

 (pō′ĭt-ăs′tər)
n.
A writer of insignificant, meretricious, or shoddy poetry.

[New Latin poētaster : Latin poēta, poet; see poet + Latin -aster, pejorative suff.]

poetaster

(ˌpəʊɪˈtæstə; -ˈteɪ-)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a writer of inferior verse
[C16: from Medieval Latin; see poet, -aster]

po•et•as•ter

(ˈpoʊ ɪtˌæs tər)

n.
an inferior poet; a writer of indifferent verse.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin or New Latin; see poet, -aster1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

poetaster

noun
One who writes poetry:
Translations

poetaster

[ˌpəʊɪˈtæstəʳ] Npoetastro m

poetaster

n (pej)Poetaster m, → Dichterling m
References in classic literature ?
This is an example of a class of writing which may be passed over too lightly by those whom poetasters have made distrustful of poetry.
Hazara People International Network and Hazara Democratic Party in Pakistan have asked Hazara poetasters around the world to sign this letter and send it to Minister of Foreign affairs, where the protests take place.
Fleay, Biographical Chronicle, and A Chronicle History; Penniman, The War of the Theatres (Boston: Ginn, 1897); and Small, The Stage-Quarrel Between Ben Jonson and the So-Called Poetasters (Breslau: M.
Although with Leavis he happily discards the Victorian poetasters, he will not have such as Burns cast out; it is, after all, a matter of personal integrity.
In notorious lines from "Sleep and Poetry" Keats attacks the insensibility of these poetasters, their Life of Thoughts rather than of Sensations: "beauty was awake
Though Stephen is not quite so arrogant as to say to himself, "I think I'll write a villanelle this morning," he virtually says so, and this fact shows that he is thinking in cliches, for the villanelle, though an ancient and beautiful French form, had had a great vogue among the precious poetasters of the naughty nineties in England, and by the time A Portrait appeared had already become as wearily conventional and thoroughly exhausted as the Petrarchan sonnet had become by the death of Queen Elizabeth.
Richard Burton, a British explorer who journeyed to northern Somalia in 1854 wrote, "The country teems with 'poets, poetasters, poetitoes, poetaccios': every man has his recognized position in literature as accurately defined as though he had been reviewed in a century of magazines--the fine ear of this people causing them to take the greatest pleasure in harmonious sounds and poetical expressions, whereas a false quantity or a prosaic phrase excites their violent indignation.
Perhaps his quiet, careful, unaffected voice is drowned out by the loud personalities and politically driven poetasters seizing the microphone of our cultural moment to force their message or selves upon us.
That poem and "The Resurrection at Cookham Churchyard"--fully realized achievements in a late modernist idiom--together make up a corpus that assure him a status as a first-rate "minor" poet, among a host of writers that Jonson would have scorned to call poetasters.
When Milton uses the word "libidinous" in The Reason of Church Government to describe poetasters, to take a well-known example, the term describes an overly powerful attachment to the erotic that not all humans share.
In The Reason of Church Government (1642) he says that "libidinous and ignorant Poetasters [.
He lambasts [sic] poetasters, pillories unfaithful wives, vilifies friends who wasted their talents, and he becomes especially nasty to artsy-fartsy types.