poignancy


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poign·ant

 (poin′yənt)
adj.
1.
a. Arousing deep emotion, especially pity or sorrow; touching: a poignant memory; a poignant story. See Synonyms at moving.
b. Keenly distressing to the mind or feelings: poignant anxiety.
c. Physically painful: "Keen, poignant agonies seemed to shoot from his neck downward" (Ambrose Bierce).
2. Piercing; incisive: poignant criticism.
3. Agreeably intense or stimulating: "It was a poignant delight to breathe the keen air" (Joseph A. Altsheler).
4. Archaic
a. Sharp or sour to the taste; piquant.
b. Sharp or pungent to the smell.

[Middle English poinaunt, from Old French poignant, present participle of poindre, to prick, from Latin pungere; see peuk- in Indo-European roots.]

poign′ance, poign′an·cy n.
poign′ant·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poignancy - a state of deeply felt distress or sorrow; "a moment of extraordinary poignancy"
sorrowfulness, sadness, sorrow - the state of being sad; "she tired of his perpetual sadness"
2.poignancy - a quality that arouses emotions (especially pity or sorrow)poignancy - a quality that arouses emotions (especially pity or sorrow); "the film captured all the pathos of their situation"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare

poignancy

Translations

poignancy

[ˈpɔɪnjənsɪ] Npatetismo m

poignancy

[ˈpɔɪnjənsi] n
The film contains moments of almost unbearable poignancy → Le film contient des moments si poignants qu'ils en sont presque insoutenables.

poignancy

nErgreifende(s) nt; (of look, memories)Wehmut f; (of distress, regret)Schmerzlichkeit f; the poignancy of his messagedie Wehmut, die in seinen Worten lag; he writes with great poignancyer schreibt sehr ergreifend

poignancy

[ˈpɔɪnjənsɪ] n (of grief) → intensità
it was a moment of extraordinary poignancy → fu un attimo di grande commozione
References in classic literature ?
The recognition did not lessen the reality, the poignancy of the revelation by any suggestion or promise of instability.
He said it with admirable serenity, with positive unimpeachable gaiety; and doubtless it was that very note that most evoked for me the poignancy, the unnatural childish tragedy, of his probable reappearance at the end of three months with all this bravado and still more dishonor.
Copperfield, what the poignancy of my feelings must be, when I inform you that Mr.
The censure of a bad appointment, on account of the uncertainty of its author, and for want of a determinate object, has neither poignancy nor duration.
To be "run ashore" has the littleness, poignancy, and bitterness of human error.
Each, on the contrary, imparted strength and poignancy to its opposite.
As he stood in the darkness outside the church these memories came back with the poignancy of vanished things.
On the evening in question the little scene acquired an added poignancy by reminding him--he could not have said why--of his leave-taking from Madame Olenska after their confidential talk a week or ten days earlier.
The absurdity that clung to everything connected with Dirk Stroeve gave it a curious note, like an unresolved discord, but made it somehow more modern, more human; like a rough joke thrown into a serious scene, it heightened the poignancy which all beauty has.
There was a moment's silence, a silence which in this corner of the great room seemed marked with a certain poignancy.
Although he did not forget Skipper, the poignancy of his loss faded with the passage of time, until uppermost in his mind was the desire to be free.
defines the matrimonial situation with precision, point and poignancy.