point-shaving


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point-shav·ing

(point′shā′vĭng)
n.
The illegal practice of deliberately limiting the number of points scored by one's team in an athletic contest, as in return for a payment from gamblers to ensure winnings.
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No one is going to watch, much less bet on, a contest infested with point-shaving and other forms of performance manipulation.
Yet he soon persuaded the member schools to punish the University of Kentucky's basketball team, which had been implicated in a point-shaving scandal, by boycotting it for a season.
Businessman pleads guilty in Toledo point-shaving scandal.
827 winning percentage), Bee's collegiate coaching career ended with Long Island University's deep involvement in the 1951 point-shaving scandal and, when scholars write about Bee, invariably they do so in the context of the gambling scandal.
This portion of the bylaw was adopted to address incidences such a point-shaving.
A former University of Toledo basketball player was charged with fixing games, a little over a year after a former Toledo football player was charged with point-shaving, according to a federal bill of information filed in U.
Furthermore, legal casinos may unwittingly play an essential role in the ability of corrupt gamblers to fix sports contests via point-shaving.
Even the financially struggling NHL has been getting in on the act of mocking NBA refs lately, as the Dallas Stars took out a billboard referencing the point-shaving scandal, which states, "The only thing our refs shave is the ice.
During one of these forays, they overhear a conversation involving a star basketball player and a point-shaving scheme.
Without the option of betting money in Nevada," Pendergast told members of Congress, "the Northwestern basketball point-shaving scandal would not have occurred.
The senator pointed to a chart that showed how point-shaving scandals have boomed like the stock market: In the 1990s, there were eight such grifts, compared to only one in the 1970s.
Among McDonald's victories as a prosecutor are the convictions of Bronx Congressman Mario Biaggi and Brooklyn Democratic Leader Meade Esposito, the "Abscam" case against New Jersey Senator Harrison Williams, the Boston College basketball point-shaving incident, and the Lufthansa "Goodfellas" robbery case.