poke


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Related to poke: pig in a poke

poke 1

 (pōk)
v. poked, pok·ing, pokes
v.tr.
1. To push or jab at, as with a finger or an arm; prod.
2. To make (a hole or pathway, for example) by or as if by prodding, elbowing, or jabbing: I poked my way to the front of the crowd.
3. To push; thrust: A seal poked its head out of the water.
4. To stir (a fire) by prodding the wood or coal with a poker or stick.
5. Slang To strike; punch.
v.intr.
1. To make thrusts or jabs, as with a stick or poker.
2. To pry or meddle; intrude: poking into another's business.
3. To search or look curiously in a desultory manner: poked about in the desk.
4. To proceed in a slow or lazy manner; putter: just poked along all morning.
5. To thrust forward; appear: The child's head poked from under the blankets.
n.
1. A push, thrust, or jab.
2. Slang A punch or blow with the fist: a poke in the jaw.
3. One who moves slowly or aimlessly; a dawdler.
Idiom:
poke fun at
To ridicule in a mischievous manner.

[Middle English poken, probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch.]

poke 2

 (pōk)
n.
1. A projecting brim at the front of a bonnet.
2. A large bonnet having a projecting brim.

[From poke.]

poke 3

 (pōk)
n. Chiefly Southern US
A sack; a bag.

[Middle English, probably from Old North French; see pocket.]
Word History: A pig in a poke is a colorful vernacular expression used to describe something offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value. Naturally, a buyer cannot inspect the pig if it is covered by a poke—that is, a bag or sack. The word poke meaning "bag" is not confined to just the American South—in many parts of Scotland, poke bag is still used of a little paper bag for carrying purchases like candy. Poke first appears in English in the 1200s and probably comes from Old North French, the northern dialect of Old French. The Old North French word in turn is probably of Germanic origin and is related to words like Icelandic poki, "bag." Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket, meaning "pouch, small bag," which in turn comes from Anglo-Norman pokete, a diminutive of Old North French poke. Pouche, a variant form of Old North French poke, is the source of the English word pouch.

poke 4

 (pōk)
n.
Pokeweed.

[Short for dialectal pocan, of Virginia Algonquian origin; akin to puccoon.]

poke

(pəʊk)
vb
1. (tr) to jab or prod, as with the elbow, the finger, a stick, etc
2. (tr) to make (a hole, opening, etc) by or as by poking
3. (when: intr, often foll by at) to thrust (at)
4. (tr) informal to hit with the fist; punch
5. (usually foll by: in, out, out of, through, etc) to protrude or cause to protrude: don't poke your arm out of the window.
6. (tr) to stir (a fire, pot, etc) by poking
7. (intr) to meddle or intrude
8. (intr; often foll by about or around) to search or pry
9. (often foll by: along) to loiter, potter, dawdle, etc
10. (tr) slang (of a man) to have sexual intercourse with
11. poke fun at to mock or ridicule
12. poke one's nose into See nose18
n
13. a jab or prod
14. short for slowpoke
15. informal a blow with one's fist; punch
16. slang sexual intercourse
[C14: from Low German and Middle Dutch poken to thrust, prod, strike]

poke

(pəʊk)
n
1. dialect a pocket or bag
2. a pig in a poke See pig9
[C13: from Old Northern French poque, of Germanic origin; related to Old English pocca bag, Old Norse poki pouch, Middle Dutch poke bag; compare poach2]

poke

(pəʊk)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: poke bonnet a woman's bonnet with a brim that projects at the front, popular in the 18th and 19th centuries
2. (Clothing & Fashion) the brim itself
[C18: from poke1 (in the sense: to thrust out, project)]

poke

(pəʊk)
n
(Plants) short for pokeweed

poke1

(poʊk)

v. poked, pok•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to prod or push, esp. with something narrow or pointed.
2. to make (a hole, one's way, etc.) by or as if by prodding or pushing.
3. to thrust or push: She poked her head out of the window.
4. to force, drive, or stir by or as if by pushing or thrusting: to poke the fire up.
v.i.
5. to make a pushing or thrusting movement with the finger, a stick, etc.
6. to extend or project (often fol. by out).
7. to thrust oneself obtrusively.
8. to search curiously; pry (often fol. by around or about).
9. to go or proceed in a slow or aimless way (often fol. by along).
n.
10. a thrust or push.
11. slowpoke.
Idioms:
1. poke fun at, to ridicule or mock.
2. poke one's nose into, to meddle in; pry into.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle Dutch, Middle Low German poken to thrust. compare poach1]
pok′a•ble, adj.

poke2

(poʊk)

n.
1. Chiefly Midland U.S. a bag or sack, esp. a small one.
2. Archaic. a pocket.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Middle Dutch, whence also Old North French poque, French poche bag, pocket; compare poach2, pocket, pouch]

poke3

(poʊk)

n.
1. a projecting brim at the front of a bonnet, framing the face.
2. Also called poke′ bon`net. a bonnet or hat with such a brim.
[1760–70; perhaps identical with poke1]

poke4

(poʊk)

n.
[1590–1600; perhaps shortening of obsolete pocan pokeweed, perhaps variant of puccoon(pokeberries and puccoon roots were both sources of red dye)]

Poke

 a bag containing a definite amount which varied according to the commodity.
Examples: poke of bran, 1875; of corn, 1648; of hops, 1883; of madder (20 cwt), 1347; of silver, 1733; of pardon, 1377; of pence, 1575; of plums, 1581; of wool, c. 1500.

poke


Past participle: poked
Gerund: poking

Imperative
poke
poke
Present
I poke
you poke
he/she/it pokes
we poke
you poke
they poke
Preterite
I poked
you poked
he/she/it poked
we poked
you poked
they poked
Present Continuous
I am poking
you are poking
he/she/it is poking
we are poking
you are poking
they are poking
Present Perfect
I have poked
you have poked
he/she/it has poked
we have poked
you have poked
they have poked
Past Continuous
I was poking
you were poking
he/she/it was poking
we were poking
you were poking
they were poking
Past Perfect
I had poked
you had poked
he/she/it had poked
we had poked
you had poked
they had poked
Future
I will poke
you will poke
he/she/it will poke
we will poke
you will poke
they will poke
Future Perfect
I will have poked
you will have poked
he/she/it will have poked
we will have poked
you will have poked
they will have poked
Future Continuous
I will be poking
you will be poking
he/she/it will be poking
we will be poking
you will be poking
they will be poking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been poking
you have been poking
he/she/it has been poking
we have been poking
you have been poking
they have been poking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been poking
you will have been poking
he/she/it will have been poking
we will have been poking
you will have been poking
they will have been poking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been poking
you had been poking
he/she/it had been poking
we had been poking
you had been poking
they had been poking
Conditional
I would poke
you would poke
he/she/it would poke
we would poke
you would poke
they would poke
Past Conditional
I would have poked
you would have poked
he/she/it would have poked
we would have poked
you would have poked
they would have poked

Poke

1. A sack.
2. A plant whose leaves are sometimes used for salad.
3. Also, see Cowpoke.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poke - tall coarse perennial American herb having small white flowers followed by blackish-red berries on long drooping racemespoke - tall coarse perennial American herb having small white flowers followed by blackish-red berries on long drooping racemes; young fleshy stems are edible; berries and root are poisonous
pokeweed - perennial of the genus Phytolacca
2.poke - someone who takes more time than necessarypoke - someone who takes more time than necessary; someone who lags behind
do-nothing, idler, layabout, loafer, bum - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"
lingerer, loiterer - someone who lingers aimlessly in or about a place
slowcoach, slowpoke, stick-in-the-mud, plodder - someone who moves slowly; "in England they call a slowpoke a slowcoach"
potterer, putterer - a person who putters about
straggler, strayer - someone who strays or falls behind
3.poke - a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchasespoke - a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchases
bag - a flexible container with a single opening; "he stuffed his laundry into a large bag"
doggie bag, doggy bag - a bag for food that a customer did not eat at a restaurant; the transparent pretense is that the food is taken home to feed the customer's dog
grocery bag - a sack for holding customer's groceries
4.poke - a sharp hand gesture (resembling a blow)poke - a sharp hand gesture (resembling a blow); "he warned me with a jab with his finger"; "he made a thrusting motion with his fist"
gesture - motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
5.poke - (boxing) a blow with the fistpoke - (boxing) a blow with the fist; "I gave him a clout on his nose"
counterpunch, parry, counter - a return punch (especially by a boxer)
knockout punch, KO punch, Sunday punch, haymaker - a hard punch that renders the opponent unable to continue boxing
hook - a short swinging punch delivered from the side with the elbow bent
jab - a quick short straight punch
rabbit punch - a short chopping blow to the back of the neck
sucker punch - an unexpected punch
boxing, pugilism, fisticuffs - fighting with the fists
blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
Verb1.poke - poke or thrust abruptly; "he jabbed his finger into her ribs"
thrust - push forcefully; "He thrust his chin forward"
2.poke - search or inquire in a meddlesome waypoke - search or inquire in a meddlesome way; "This guy is always nosing around the office"
search, look - search or seek; "We looked all day and finally found the child in the forest"; "Look elsewhere for the perfect gift!"
3.poke - stir by poking; "poke the embers in the fireplace"
raise up, commove, disturb, stir up, vex, shake up, agitate - change the arrangement or position of
4.poke - hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument; "the salesman pounded the door knocker"; "a bible-thumping Southern Baptist"
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"
5.poke - make a hole by poking
pierce - make a hole into; "The needle pierced her flesh"

poke

verb
1. jab, hit, push, stick, dig, punch, stab, thrust, butt, elbow, shove, nudge, prod Lindy poked him in the ribs.
2. protrude, stick, thrust, jut His fingers poked through the worn tips of his gloves.
noun
1. jab, hit, dig, punch, thrust, butt, nudge, prod John smiled and gave Richard a playful poke.
poke around or about search, fish, hunt, go through, rifle, comb, scour, grub, ferret, rummage (around), sift through, forage, scavenge, rake through, fossick (Austral. & N.Z.), root about or around He poked around in the cupboard for the bottle of whisky.

poke

verb
1. To thrust against or into:
2. To cause to stick out:
3. To look into or inquire about curiously, inquisitively, or in a meddlesome fashion:
Informal: nose (around).
Idiom: stick one's nose into.
4. To reach about or search blindly or uncertainly:
5. To go or move slowly so that progress is hindered:
noun
1. An act of thrusting into or against, as to attract attention:
Translations
نَخْسَه، دَفْعَهيُبْرِزُيَثْقُبيَدفَع، يَنْخُسُيَلْكُمُ
šťouchnoutstrčitudělatvstrčitvystrčit
stødepufpuffestikkestød
kohentaasorkkiatökätätökkiä
bockati
bedugjakidugja
olnbogaskotpota írekastinga
つつく
찌르다
kištikišti nosį įkumštelėjimaskumštelėtikyšoti
bakstītbelziensbikstītdunkadurt
štuchanec
dregnitipomoliti
stöta
แหย่ด้วยข้อศอกหรือนิ้ว
batırarak delik açmakçık makdürt mekdürtmekdüt me
chọc

poke

1 [pəʊk]
A. N
1. (= jab) → empujón m, empellón m; (with elbow) → codazo m; (with poker) → hurgonada f, hurgonazo m
he gave me a poke in the ribs (with finger) → me hincó el dedo en las costillas; (with elbow) → me dio un codazo en las costillas
to give the fire a pokeatizar la lumbre, remover la lumbre
2. to have a poke (Brit) (= have sex) → echar(se) un polvo
B. VT
1. (= jab with stick, finger etc) → pinchar, clavar; [+ fire] → hurgar, atizar, remover
to poke sb in the ribshincar el dedo a algn en las costillas
to poke sb with a stickdar a algn un empujón con un palo
you nearly poked me in the eye with that!¡casi me saltas un ojo con eso!
2. (= thrust) → introducir
to poke a rag into a tubemeter un trapo en un tubo
to poke a stick into a crackmeter un palo en una grieta
to poke a stick into the groundclavar un palo en el suelo
to poke one's head out (of a window)sacar or asomar la cabeza (por una ventana)
see also nose A1
3. [+ hole] → hacer
to poke a hole in a picturehacer un agujero en un cuadro
4. to poke fun at sbreírse de algn
5. (US) (= punch) → pegar un puñetazo a
C. VI to poke at sth with a stickhurgar algo con un bastón
poke about poke around VI + ADV (in drawers, attic etc) → fisgonear, hurgar; (round shops) → curiosear (pej) → fisgar, hacer indagaciones a hurtadillas
we spent a day poking about in the shopspasamos un día curioseando en las tiendas
and now you come poking about!¡y ahora te metes a husmear!
poke out
A. VI + ADV (= stick out) → salir
B. VT + ADV you almost poked my eye outcasi me saltas el ojo

poke

2 [pəʊk] N (esp Scot) (= bag) → saco m, bolsa f
see also pig

poke

[ˈpəʊk]
vt
[+ fire] → tisonner
(= dig at) → piquer
He poked the ground with his stick → Il piquait le sol du bout de sa canne.
(= jab) (with finger)pousser du doigt; (with elbow)donner un coup de coude à
to poke sb in the ribs (with elbow)enfoncer son coude dans les côtes à qn
(= put) to poke sth into sth → fourrer or enfoncer qch dans qch
[+ head] to poke one's head out of the window → passer la tête par la fenêtre
to poke one's head around the door → passer la tête par la porte
She tapped on my door and poked her head in → Elle a frappé à ma porte et a passé la tête.
to poke fun at sb/sth → se moquer de qn/qch
vi (= appear) → pointer
n
(= jab) → (petit) coup m
to give sb/sth a poke → donner un petit coup à qn/qch
(= look) to have a poke around sth → jeter un coup d'œil dans qch
to have a poke about → jeter un coup d'œil
(to fire)coup m de tisonnier
to give the fire a poke → tisonner le feu
poke about
vi
(in place)fouiner
(in engine, sb's mouth)fourrager; (in cupboard)fouiner, fourrager
vt fus [+ place] → fouiner dans
poke around
vi
(in place)fouiner
(in engine, sb's mouth)fourrager; (in cupboard)fouiner, fourrager
vt fus
[+ place] → fouiner dans
[+ engine, sb's mouth] → fourrager dans; [+ cupboard] → fouiner dans, fourrager dans
poke at
vt fus [+ fire] → tisonner
She poked at her food with a fork → Elle poussait le contenu de son assiette du bout de sa fourchette.
poke out
vi (= protrude) → dépasser
poke out of
vt fusdépasser de

poke

1
n (dial, Scot)Beutel m, → Sack m (dial); (plastic, paper) → Tüte f ? pig

poke

2
n
(= jab)Stoß m, → Schubs m (inf); to give somebody/something a poke (with stick) → jdn/etw stoßen; (with finger) → jdn/etw stupsen; I got a poke in the eye from his umbrellaer stieß mir den Regenschirm ins Auge; it’s better than a poke in the eye (with a sharp stick) (inf)es ist besser als gar nichts
(US inf: = punch) → Schlag m; poke on the noseNasenstüber m
(vulg: = act of intercourse) → Vögeln nt (inf); to have a pokevögeln (inf), → ficken (vulg)
vt
(= jab) (with stick) → stoßen; (with finger) → stupsen; to poke the firedas Feuer schüren, im Feuer stochern; he poked the ground with his sticker stieß mit seinem Stock auf den Boden; he accidentally poked me in the eyeer hat mir aus Versehen ins Auge gestoßen
(US inf: = punch) → hauen (inf); to poke somebody on the nosejdn auf die Nase hauen or schlagen
(= thrust) to poke one’s head/finger/a stick etc into somethingseinen Kopf/Finger/einen Stock etc in etw (acc)stecken; he poked his head round the door/out of the windower streckte seinen Kopf durch die Tür/aus dem Fenster
(vulg: = have sex with) → vögeln (inf), → ficken (vulg)
(= make by poking) holebohren; to poke holes in somebody’s storyjds Geschichte zerpflücken
vi his elbows were poking through his sleevesan seinen Ärmeln kamen schon die Ellenbogen durch; to poke at something (testing) → etw prüfen; (searching) → in etw (dat)stochern; he poked at me with his finger (touching) → er stupste mich; (not touching) → er stieß mit dem Finger nach mir; the doctor poked at his ribsder Arzt tastete seine Rippen ab; she poked at her food with a forksie stocherte mit einer Gabel in ihrem Essen herum; well, if you will go poking into things that don’t concern you …na ja, wenn du deine Nase ständig in Dinge steckst, die dich nichts angehen

poke

[pəʊk]
1. n (jab) → colpetto; (with elbow) → gomitata
to give the fire a poke → attizzare il fuoco
2. vt
a. (jab with stick, finger) → dare un colpetto a
to poke sb with one's umbrella → dare un colpetto con l'ombrello a qn
you poked me in the eye → mi hai messo un dito nell'occhio
to poke the fire → attizzare il fuoco
b. to poke fun at sb (mock) → prendere in giro qn
c. (Am) (fam) (punch) → dare un pugno a
d. (thrust) → cacciare, ficcare
to poke one's head out of the window → mettere la testa fuori dalla finestra
to poke sth in(to) sth → spingere qc dentro qc
e. (make by poking) to poke a hole in sthfare un buco in qc (con il dito, un bastone)
3. vi to poke atdare dei colpetti a
poke about poke around vi + adv (fam) (in drawers, attic) → frugare, rovistare; (in shop) → curiosare
poke out
1. vi + advspuntar fuori, sporger fuori
2. vt + adv to poke sb's eye outcavare un occhio a qn

poke

(pəuk) verb
1. to push something into; to prod. He poked a stick into the hole; He poked her in the ribs with his elbow.
2. to make (a hole) by doing this. She poked a hole in the sand with her finger.
3. to (cause to) protrude or project. She poked her head in at the window; His foot was poking out of the blankets.
noun
an act of poking; a prod or nudge. He gave me a poke in the arm.
ˈpoker noun
a (usually metal) rod for stirring up a fire.
ˈpoky, pokey adjective
(of a room etc) small, with not enough space.
poke about/around
to look or search for something among other things.
poke fun at
to laugh at unkindly. The children often poked fun at him because of his stammer.
poke one's nose into
to interfere with other people's business. He is always poking his nose into my affairs.

poke

يَلْكُمُ šťouchnout støde stupsen μπήγω clavar tökätä donner un coup à bockati colpire つつく 찌르다 porren skubbe szturchnąć cutucar, espetar тыкать stöta แหย่ด้วยข้อศอกหรือนิ้ว dürtmek chọc
References in classic literature ?
I should think she'd hate to poke herself where she isn't wanted," said Jo crossly, for she disliked the trouble of overseeing a fidgety child when she wanted to enjoy herself.
Just take your club and poke it out of the way," the young inventor advised.
The mottled, pin-headed guinea-hens, always resentful of captivity, ran screeching out into the tunnel and tried to poke their ugly, painted faces through the snow walls.
I was comforting myself, however, with the thought that in pious Bildad might be found some salvation, spite of his seven hundred and seventy-seventh lay; when I felt a sudden sharp poke in my rear, and turning round, was horrified at the apparition of Captain Peleg in the act of withdrawing his leg from my immediate vicinity.
In a ship I belonged to, a small cub Sperm Whale was once bodily hoisted to the deck for his poke or bag, to make sheaths for the barbs of the harpoons, and for the heads of the lances.
There came a time when there was so little flesh on him that the bones began to poke through-- which was a horrible thing to see or even to think of.
Missis wouldn't hear of our ridin' the critters over Lizy's bridge tonight;" and, with a facetious poke into Andy's ribs, he started off, followed by the latter, at full speed,--their shouts of laughter coming faintly on the wind.
Burns, you poke your chin most unpleasantly; draw it in.
Here's a worse ghost than any of 'em -- a ghost in a gray cloak and a poke bonnet.
It cramped and hurt me so, that it made me perfectly miserable; but if I moved in the least, and made a glass that was in the basket rattle against something else (as it was sure to do), she gave me the cruellest poke with her foot, and said, 'Come, don't YOU fidget.
Wopsle referred to me, he considered it a necessary part of such reference to rumple my hair and poke it into my eyes.
I heard the words and took no note, and she poke again to Umslopogaas, saying: "Here is a mystery, O Lord Bulalio.