polarization

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Related to polarized light: unpolarized light, Circularly polarized light

po·lar·i·za·tion

 (pō′lər-ĭ-zā′shən)
n.
1. The production or condition of polarity, as:
a. A process or state in which rays of light exhibit different properties in different directions, especially the state in which all the vibration takes place in one plane.
b. The partial or complete polar separation of the positive and negative electric charges in a nuclear, atomic, molecular, or chemical system.
2. A division into two conflicting or contrasting groups.

polarization

(ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən) or

polarisation

n
1. the condition of having or giving polarity
2. (General Physics) physics the process or phenomenon in which the waves of light or other electromagnetic radiation are restricted to certain directions of vibration, usually specified in terms of the electric field vector

po•lar•i•za•tion

(ˌpoʊ lər əˈzeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a sharp division, as of a population or group, into opposing factions.
2. a state, or the production of a state, in which rays of light or similar radiation exhibit different properties in different directions.
3. the induction of polarity in a ferromagnetic substance; magnetization.
4. the production or acquisition of polarity.

polarization

In transverse waves, vibrations confined to one plane.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polarization - the phenomenon in which waves of light or other radiation are restricted in direction of vibrationpolarization - the phenomenon in which waves of light or other radiation are restricted in direction of vibration
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
2.polarization - the condition of having or giving polarity
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
Translations
polarizace
polarisation d'une antenne

polarization

[ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən] N
1. (Elec, Phys) → polarización f
2. (frm) (fig) [of tendencies, opinions, people] → polarización f

polarization

[ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən] polarisation (British) nopposition f

polarization

n (Phys) → Polarisation f; (fig)Polarisierung f

polarization

[ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃn] npolarizzazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Lamp polarized light therapy lamp for treatment of polarized light, the degree of polarization of at least 95% and a power halogen bulb at least 20 W lamp equipped with a tripod 1 Annex 6 to the SETC - pos.
Linearly polarized light is an electromagnetic wave whose electric and magnetic fields oscillate along fixed directions when the light travels through space.
With this observation, Kirchhoff was emphasizing that certain objects, especially when highly anisotropic in their crystal structure, could emit polarized light [6, p.
Polarized light microscopes are now optimized to offer extreme resolution of pharmaceutical products.
2 includes enhancements that make the analysis of polarized light faster and easier.
Polarized light microscopy is used to identify and characterize materials on the basis of their crystallinity.
The map also reveals that regions of the galaxy with low concentrations of dust can emit highly polarized light, Mortonson says.
Like polarized light (which vibrates in one direction and is produced by the scattering of visible light off the surface of the ocean, for example), the polarized "B-mode" microwaves the scientists discovered were produced when CMB radiation from the early universe scattered off electrons 380,000 years after the Big Bang, when the cosmos cooled enough to allow protons and electrons to combine into atoms.
They cover neural and oscillatory networks of associative memory, oscillatory networks for modeling the brain structure's performance, image processing based on the oscillatory network model, parallel information processing and photon echo, and stochastic oscillators for modeling polarized light beams.
0--a new era ofthe company, refocused to making a device that will combine diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, polarized light difference imaging (PDI), and maybe even fluorescence, into one digital technology (Fig.
Polarized light also travels, but mostly moves in two dimensions: horizontally and vertically.
The "stauroscope", an optical instrument for studying the crystal structure of minerals under polarized light, is also no longer used.