pole


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Pole

 (pōl)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Poland.
2. A person of Polish ancestry.

pole 1

 (pōl)
n.
1. Either extremity of an axis through a sphere.
2. Either of the regions contiguous to the extremities of the earth's rotational axis, the North Pole or the South Pole.
3. Physics See magnetic pole.
4. Electricity Either of two oppositely charged terminals, as in an electric cell or battery.
5. Astronomy See celestial pole.
6. Biology
a. Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.
b. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
c. The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.
7. Either of two antithetical ideas, propensities, forces, or positions.
8. A fixed point of reference.
9. Mathematics
a. The origin in a polar coordinate system; the vertex of a polar angle.
b. A point in the complex plane at which a given function is not defined.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin polus, from Greek polos, axis, sky; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

pole 2

 (pōl)
n.
1. A long, relatively slender, generally rounded piece of wood or other material.
2. The long tapering wooden shaft extending up from the front axle of a vehicle to the collars of the animals drawing it; a tongue.
3.
a. See rod.
b. A unit of area equal to a square rod.
4. Sports The inside position on the starting line of a racetrack: qualified in the time trials to start on the pole.
v. poled, pol·ing, poles
v.tr.
1.
a. To propel with a pole: boatmen poling barges up a placid river.
b. To propel (oneself) or make (one's way) by the use of ski poles: "We ski through the glades on corn snow, then pole our way over a long one-hour runout to a road" (Frederick Selby).
2. To support (plants) with a pole.
3. To strike, poke, or stir with a pole.
v.intr.
1. To propel a boat or raft with a pole.
2. To use ski poles to maintain or gain speed.

[Middle English, from Old English pāl, from Latin pālus, stake; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pole

(pəʊl)
n
1. (Tools) a long slender usually round piece of wood, metal, or other material
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) the piece of timber on each side of which a pair of carriage horses are hitched
3. (Units) another name for rod7
4. (Horse Racing) horse racing chiefly
a. the inside lane of a racecourse
b. (as modifier): the pole position.
c. one of a number of markers placed at intervals of one sixteenth of a mile along the side of a racecourse
5. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. any light spar
b. the part of a mast between the head and the attachment of the uppermost shrouds
6. (Nautical Terms) under bare poles nautical (of a sailing vessel) with no sails set
7. up the pole informal
a. slightly mad
b. mistaken; on the wrong track
vb
8. (tr) to strike or push with a pole
9. (Horticulture) (tr)
a. to set out (an area of land or garden) with poles
b. to support (a crop, such as hops or beans) on poles
10. (Metallurgy) (tr) to deoxidize (a molten metal, esp copper) by stirring it with green wood
11. (Nautical Terms) to punt (a boat)
[Old English pāl, from Latin pālus a stake, prop; see pale2]

pole

(pəʊl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) either of the two antipodal points where the earth's axis of rotation meets the earth's surface. See also North Pole, South Pole
2. (Astronomy) astronomy short for celestial pole
3. (General Physics) physics
a. either of the two regions at the extremities of a magnet to which the lines of force converge or from which they diverge
b. either of two points or regions in a piece of material, system, etc, at which there are opposite electric charges, as at the two terminals of a battery
4. (Mathematics) maths an isolated singularity of an analytical function
5. (Biology) biology
a. either end of the axis of a cell, spore, ovum, or similar body
b. either end of the spindle formed during the metaphase of mitosis and meiosis
6. (Physiology) physiol the point on a neuron from which the axon or dendrites project from the cell body
7. either of two mutually exclusive or opposite actions, opinions, etc
8. (Mathematics) geometry the origin in a system of polar or spherical coordinates
9. any fixed point of reference
10. poles apart poles asunder having widely divergent opinions, tastes, etc
11. (Physical Geography) from pole to pole throughout the entire world
[C14: from Latin polus end of an axis, from Greek polos pivot, axis, pole; related to Greek kuklos circle]

Pole

(pəʊl)
n
(Languages) a native, inhabitant, or citizen of Poland or a speaker of Polish

Pole

(pəʊl)
n
(Biography) Reginald. 1500–58, English cardinal; last Roman Catholic archbishop of Canterbury (1556–58)

pole1

(poʊl)

n., v. poled, pol•ing. n.
1. a long, cylindrical, often slender piece of wood, metal, etc.
2. a tapering piece of wood or other material that extends from the front axle of a vehicle between the animals drawing it.
3. the inside position on the front row of the starting line of a race.
v.t.
5. to furnish with poles.
6. to push, strike, or propel with a pole: to pole a raft.
v.i.
7. to use a pole or poles, as to propel a boat or raft or push oneself on skis.
[before 1050; Middle English; Old English pāl < Latin pālus stake. compare pale2]

pole2

(poʊl)

n.
1. each of the extremities of the earth's axis or of any spherical body.
2. one of two opposite or contrasted principles or tendencies.
3. a point of concentration of interest, attention, etc.
4. either of the two regions or parts of an electric battery, magnet, or the like, that exhibits electrical or magnetic polarity.
5. Cell Biol.
a. either end of an ideal axis in a nucleus, cell, or ovum, about which parts are more or less symmetrically arranged.
b. either end of a spindle-shaped figure formed in a cell during mitosis.
c. the place at which a cell extension or process begins, as a nerve cell axon or a flagellum.
Idioms:
poles apart, having widely divergent or opposing attitudes, interests, etc.: On political issues they are poles apart.
[1350–1400; < Latin polus < Greek pólos pivot, pole]

Pole

(poʊl)

n.
a native or inhabitant of Poland.

Pole

(poʊl)

n. Reginald,
1500–58, English cardinal and last Roman Catholic archbishop of Canterbury.

pole

(pōl)
1. Mathematics
a. Either of the points at which an axis that passes through the center of a sphere intersects the surface of the sphere.
b. The fixed point used as a reference in a system of polar coordinates. It corresponds to the origin in the Cartesian coordinate system.
2. Geography
a. Either of the points at which the Earth's axis of rotation intersects the Earth's surface; the North Pole or South Pole.
b. Either of the two similar points on another planet.
3. Physics A magnetic pole.
4. Electricity Either of two oppositely charged terminals, such as the two electrodes of an electrolytic cell or the electric terminals of a battery.

polar adjective

pole

  • boom - From Dutch, originally a long beam or pole.
  • pogo stick - Came onto the scene around 1921, but is of uncertain etymology, possibly from "pole" and "go."
  • pole position - Refers to pole as the term for the inside fence on a racecourse.
  • trolley pole - The pole sticking up from a bumper car.

pole


Past participle: poled
Gerund: poling

Imperative
pole
pole
Present
I pole
you pole
he/she/it poles
we pole
you pole
they pole
Preterite
I poled
you poled
he/she/it poled
we poled
you poled
they poled
Present Continuous
I am poling
you are poling
he/she/it is poling
we are poling
you are poling
they are poling
Present Perfect
I have poled
you have poled
he/she/it has poled
we have poled
you have poled
they have poled
Past Continuous
I was poling
you were poling
he/she/it was poling
we were poling
you were poling
they were poling
Past Perfect
I had poled
you had poled
he/she/it had poled
we had poled
you had poled
they had poled
Future
I will pole
you will pole
he/she/it will pole
we will pole
you will pole
they will pole
Future Perfect
I will have poled
you will have poled
he/she/it will have poled
we will have poled
you will have poled
they will have poled
Future Continuous
I will be poling
you will be poling
he/she/it will be poling
we will be poling
you will be poling
they will be poling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been poling
you have been poling
he/she/it has been poling
we have been poling
you have been poling
they have been poling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been poling
you will have been poling
he/she/it will have been poling
we will have been poling
you will have been poling
they will have been poling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been poling
you had been poling
he/she/it had been poling
we had been poling
you had been poling
they had been poling
Conditional
I would pole
you would pole
he/she/it would pole
we would pole
you would pole
they would pole
Past Conditional
I would have poled
you would have poled
he/she/it would have poled
we would have poled
you would have poled
they would have poled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pole - a long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plasticpole - a long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plastic
barge pole - a long pole used to propel or guide a barge; "I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole"
microphone boom, boom - a pole carrying an overhead microphone projected over a film or tv set
caber - a heavy wooden pole (such as the trunk of a young fir) that is tossed as a test of strength (in the Highlands of northern Scotland)
clothes tree, coat stand, coat tree - an upright pole with pegs or hooks on which to hang clothing
mast - any sturdy upright pole
rod - a long thin implement made of metal or wood
ski pole - a pole with metal points used as an aid in skiing
spar - a stout rounded pole of wood or metal used to support rigging
stilt - one of two stout poles with foot rests in the middle; used for walking high above the ground; "he was so tall I thought he was on stilts"
2.Pole - a native or inhabitant of Poland
Poland, Polska, Republic of Poland - a republic in central Europe; the invasion of Poland by Germany in 1939 started World War II
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
polack - a person of Polish descent
3.pole - one of two divergent or mutually exclusive opinions; "they are at opposite poles"; "they are poles apart"
opinion, persuasion, sentiment, thought, view - a personal belief or judgment that is not founded on proof or certainty; "my opinion differs from yours"; "I am not of your persuasion"; "what are your thoughts on Haiti?"
4.pole - a linear measure of 16.5 feet
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
yard, pace - a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride
furlong - a unit of length equal to 220 yards
5.pole - a square rod of land
area unit, square measure - a system of units used to measure areas
6.pole - one of two points of intersection of the Earth's axis and the celestial sphere
celestial point - a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
7.pole - one of two antipodal points where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects the Earth's surface
geographic point, geographical point - a point on the surface of the Earth
8.pole - a contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves
anode - the negatively charged terminal of a voltaic cell or storage battery that supplies current
electric battery, battery - a device that produces electricity; may have several primary or secondary cells arranged in parallel or series
tangency, contact - (electronics) a junction where things (as two electrical conductors) touch or are in physical contact; "they forget to solder the contacts"
electrical device - a device that produces or is powered by electricity
negative pole - the terminal of a battery that is connected to the negative plate
positive pole - the terminal of a battery that is connected to the positive plate
9.pole - a long fiberglass sports implement used for pole vaulting
sports implement - an implement used in a sport
10.pole - one of the two ends of a magnet where the magnetism seems to be concentratedpole - one of the two ends of a magnet where the magnetism seems to be concentrated
magnet - (physics) a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field
negative magnetic pole, south-seeking pole, negative pole - the pole of a magnet that points toward the south when the magnet is suspended freely
north-seeking pole, positive magnetic pole, positive pole - the pole of a magnet that points toward the north when the magnet is suspended freely
end, terminal - either extremity of something that has length; "the end of the pier"; "she knotted the end of the thread"; "they rode to the end of the line"; "the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix"
Verb1.pole - propel with a pole; "pole barges on the river"; "We went punting in Cambridge"
propel, impel - cause to move forward with force; "Steam propels this ship"
2.pole - support on poles; "pole climbing plants like beans"
hold up, support, sustain, hold - be the physical support of; carry the weight of; "The beam holds up the roof"; "He supported me with one hand while I balanced on the beam"; "What's holding that mirror?"
3.pole - deoxidize molten metals by stirring them with a wooden pole
metallurgy - the science and technology of metals
deoxidise, deoxidize, reduce - to remove oxygen from a compound, or cause to react with hydrogen or form a hydride, or to undergo an increase in the number of electrons

pole

1
noun rod, post, support, staff, standard, bar, stick, stake, paling, shaft, upright, pillar, mast, picket, spar, stave The sign hung at the top of a large pole.

pole

2
noun extremity, limit, terminus, antipode The two mayoral candidates represent opposite poles of the political spectrum.
poles apart at opposite extremes, incompatible, irreconcilable, worlds apart, miles apart, like chalk and cheese (Brit.), like night and day, widely separated, completely different, at opposite ends of the earth Her views on Europe are poles apart from those of her successor.
Translations
القُطْب المِغناطيسيبُولَنْدِيّعَمودعَمُودقطب
póltyčPoláksloup
pælpolpolak
seiväsvapanapapuolalainen
motkaPoljak
dorongpálcarúd
póllpóll, skautstaur
ポーランド人
장대폴란드 사람
kārtsmietspolsstabs
pól
drogpalicapolskok ob palicitečaj
polpolackstavstolpe
เสาชาวโปแลนด์
direkkutupgöksel kutup
cọcngười Ba Lan

Pole

[pəʊl] Npolaco/a m/f

pole

1 [pəʊl]
A. N
1. (= rod) → palo m; (= flag pole) → asta f; (= telegraph pole) → poste m; (= tentpole) → mástil m; (= curtain pole) → barra f; (for gymnastics) → percha f; (for vaulting, punting) → pértiga f, garrocha f (LAm); (for fencing) → estaca f; [of cart] → vara f, lanza f
to be up the pole > > (o.f.) → estar chiflado
2. (= archaic measure) medida de longitud, equivalente a 5,029 m
B. VT [+ punt etc] → impeler con pértiga
C. CPD pole bean N (US) → judía f trepadora
pole position N (Motor racing) → posición f de cabeza en la parrilla de salida, pole f (fig) → posición f de ventaja
pole vault Nsalto m de pértiga
pole vaulter Nsaltador(a) m/f de pértiga, pertiguista mf
pole vaulting Nsalto m de pértiga
see also pole-vault

pole

2 [pəʊl]
A. N (Elec, Geog, Astron) → polo m
North/South PolePolo m Norte/Sur
from pole to polede polo a polo
to be poles apartser polos opuestos
B. CPD Pole Star NEstrella f Polar

Pole

[ˈpəʊl] nPolonais(e) m/f

pole

[ˈpəʊl] n
(wooden)mât m, perche f
(= plant support) → tuteur m
poles for the beans to climb up → des tuteurs pour faire grimper les haricots
(also telegraph pole) → poteau m
[earth] → pôle m
the pole → le pôle
to be poles apart (= very different) → être aux antipodes l'un(e) de l'autre
to be poles apart from → être aux antipodes de

Pole

nPole m, → Polin f

pole

:
poleaxe, (US) poleax
n
(Mil) → Streitaxt f
(for slaughtering) → Schlachtbeil nt
vt
(Mil) → (mit der Streitaxt) niederschlagen or umhauen; (fig)verblüffen
animal(mit dem Schlachtbeil) töten
polecat
nIltis m; (US) → Skunk m, → Stinktier nt
pole jump
n (US) = pole vault

pole

:
pole position
n
(Motor Racing) → Poleposition f; to be or start in poleaus der Poleposition starten
(fig)günstige Ausgangsposition; to be in polein einer günstigen Ausgangsposition sein
pole star
nPolarstern m
pole vault
n (= event)Stabhochsprung m; (= one jump)Sprung mmit dem Stab
pole-vaulter
nStabhochspringer(in) m(f)
pole-vaulting

pole

1
n
Stange f; (= flagpole, telegraph pole)Mast m, → Stange f; (of cart)Deichsel f; (= ski-pole)Stock m; (for vaulting) → Stab m; (for punting) → Stange f, → Stake f (spec); to be up the pole (Brit inf) → eine Schraube locker haben (inf); to drive somebody up the pole (inf)jdn die Wände hochtreiben (inf); I wouldn’t touch it/him with a ten-foot pole (US inf) → von so etwas/so jemandem lasse ich die Finger (inf); (because disgusting, unpleasant) → das/den würde ich noch nicht mal mit der Kneifzange anfassen (inf)
(Measure: old) → Rute f (old)
vt puntstaken

pole

2
n (Geog, Astron, Elec) → Pol m; they are poles apartsie (acc)trennen Welten, Welten liegen zwischen ihnen; at opposite poles of something (fig)an entgegengesetzten Enden einer Sache (gen)

Pole

[pəʊl] npolacco/a

pole

1 [pəʊl] n (gen) → palo; (flagpole, for vaulting) → asta; (of tent, fence) → paletto; (for punting) → pertica; (curtain pole) → bastone m
up the pole (fig) (fam) (mad) → fuori di testa
to send or drive sb up the pole (infuriate) → far uscire dai gangheri qn

pole

2 [pəʊl] n (Elec, Geog, Astron) → polo
poles apart (fig) → agli antipodi

pole1

(pəul) noun
1. the north or south end of the Earth's axis. the North/South Pole.
2. the points in the heavens opposite the Earth's North and South Poles, around which stars seem to turn.
3. either of the opposite ends of a magnet. The opposite poles of magnets attract each other.
4. either of the opposite terminals of an electric battery. the positive/negative pole.
ˈpolar adjective
of the earth's North or South Pole or the region around it. the polar ice-cap; the polar region.
polar bear
a type of bear found near the North Pole.
the ˈpole star noun
(also the Pole Star) the star that is in the sky over the North Pole.
be poles apart
to be as different or as far apart as possible.

pole2

(pəul) noun
a long, thin, rounded piece of wood, metal etc. a telegraph pole; a tent pole.
ˈpole-vault noun
(in athletics etc) a type of jump made with the help of a pole.

pole

بُولَنْدِيّ, عَمُود Polák, tyč pæl, polak Pole, Stange πάσσαλος, Πόλος polaco, poste puolalainen, seiväs étai, Polonais motka, Poljak Polo ポーランド人, 棒 장대, 폴란드 사람 paal, Pool polakk, stolpe drąg, Polak mastro, polaco, polonês поляк, шест polack, stolpe เสา, ชาวโปแลนด์ direk, Kutup cọc, người Ba Lan , 波兰人

pole

n. polo.
1. cada uno de los extremos opuestos de un cuerpo u órgano o de una parte esférica u oval;
2. cualquiera de dos puntos de un imán con propiedades opuestas.
References in classic literature ?
Nice little boy, but rather a short Pole to support .
Russia seemed to me more remote than any other country-- farther away than China, almost as far as the North Pole.
The Indians warily retraced their steps toward the place they had left, when the scout, placing his pole against a rock, by a powerful shove, sent his frail bark directly into the turbulent stream.
Though, upon the whole, I greatly admire and even love the brave, the honest, and learned Captain; yet I take it very ill of him that he should so utterly ignore that case-bottle, seeing what a faithful friend and comforter it must have been, while with mittened fingers and hooded head he was studying the mathematics aloft there in that bird's nest within three or four perches of the pole.
Be cool at the equator; keep thy blood fluid at the Pole.
At last she kicked right over the carriage pole and fell down, after giving me a severe blow on my near quarter.
When he had shoveled the mold full of sand, and reached for the pounder to pound it with, it was after the manner of a canoeist running rapids and seizing a pole at sight of a submerged rock.
My dear Vermont, you natives up by the North Pole set an extravagant value on time
On a chief corner stood a lofty unpainted pole wreathed from top to bottom with tin pots and pans and cups, the chief tinmonger's noisy notice to the world (when the wind blew) that his shop was on hand for business at that corner.
Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,--that reservoir of frost and snow, where firm fields of ice, the accumulation of centuries of winters, glazed in Alpine heights above heights, surround the pole, and concentre the multiplied rigours of extreme cold.
On the ground-floor is Peggotty's kitchen, opening into a back yard; with a pigeon-house on a pole, in the centre, without any pigeons in it; a great dog- kennel in a corner, without any dog; and a quantity of fowls that look terribly tall to me, walking about, in a menacing and ferocious manner.
On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright; one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered - like an unhooped cask upon a pole - an ugly thing when you were near it; the other a gibbet, with some chains hanging to it which had once held a pirate.