polemic

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po·lem·ic

 (pə-lĕm′ĭk)
n.
1. A controversial argument, especially one refuting or attacking a specific opinion or doctrine.
2. A person engaged in or inclined to controversy, argument, or refutation.
adj. also po·lem·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
Of or relating to a controversy, argument, or refutation.

[French polémique, from Greek polemikos, hostile, from polemos, war.]

po·lem′i·cal·ly adv.

polemic

(pəˈlɛmɪk)
adj
of or involving dispute or controversy
n
1. an argument or controversy, esp over a doctrine, belief, etc
2. a person engaged in such an argument or controversy
[C17: from Medieval Latin polemicus, from Greek polemikos relating to war, from polemos war]
poˈlemically adv
polemicist, polemist n

po•lem•ic

(pəˈlɛm ɪk, poʊ-)

n.
1. a controversial argument, as one against some opinion, doctrine, etc.
2. a person who argues in opposition to another; controversialist.
adj.
3. Also, po•lem′i•cal. of or pertaining to a polemic; controversial.
[1630–40; < Greek polemikós of or for war =pólem(os) war + -ikos -ic]
po•lem′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polemic - a writer who argues in opposition to others (especially in theology)
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
2.polemic - a controversy (especially over a belief or dogma)
contestation, controversy, disceptation, arguing, argument, contention, disputation, tilt - a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
Adj.1.polemic - of or involving dispute or controversy
controversial - marked by or capable of arousing controversy; "the issue of the death penalty is highly controversial"; "Rushdie's controversial book"; "a controversial decision on affirmative action"

polemic

noun
1. argument, attack, debate, dispute, controversy, rant, tirade, diatribe, invective, philippic (rare) a polemic against the danger of secret societies

polemic

noun
A discussion, often heated, in which a difference of opinion is expressed:
Informal: hassle, rhubarb, tangle.
adjective
Translations
polemika

polemic

[pɒˈlemɪk]
A. ADJpolémico
B. Npolémica f

polemic

[pəˈlɛmɪk] npolémique f

polemic

adjpolemisch
nPolemik f

polemic

[pəˈlɛmɪk] npolemica
References in periodicals archive ?
He discusses its obscure origins among late medieval heretics in Rome, its adoption as an antipapal cartoon in Bohemia, its explication as a symbol of Lutheran opposition to Catholic practices and teachings, its interpretation as a figure of the papal Antichrist, its representation in wonder-books as a warning of the imminent apocalypse, and its use by Protestant and Catholic polemicists for propaganda.
In the same way that it is generally accepted that it is necessary to speak Chinese to write with any authority about China, or French to write about France, one wishes more of the polemicists concerned about the Middle East would acknowledge that before they begin nattering on about solutions or abuses, they might want to study up.
Next up, advocates and polemicists Robert Engelman and Brendan O'Neill present very different perspectives on what the real issues are.
Your column ran in our paper while it was owned by the right-wing polemicists Conrad Black (Baron Black of Coldharbour) and David Radler.
There are many difficulties in this attempt: surviving sources were often by polemicists anxious to score points, not to analyse carefully; Catholics were divided into two--refugees in Europe and those at home who were again divided into those who went to Anglican services and those who did not.
The sources said it is also not easy to convince Jasdaq board directors, who include such polemicists as former officials of the Bank of Japan, the Financial Services Agency and the Public Prosecutors Office.
of Bergen, Germany) examines the public debate over investiture and the varied ways polemicists from different periods of the Contest forged their arguments, while also including a Habermasian historical-sociological approach to medieval public sphere formation as a secondary note.
But, like most polemicists, Davies over-eggs the pudding by excluding (for his own ideological reasons?
It does not appear likely to me that the Protestant polemicists who turned it against the Society of Jesus had misquoted it, since the original would serve their purpose: "Sint ut sunt, aut non sint:" "Let them [Jesuits] be as they are, or let them cease to be
And yet all this is expressed in a cultured, measured, and often exquisite prose, reminiscent of the great polemicists of the past, from Thomas Paine to Rosa Luxemburg.
There is a countless stream of polemicists eager to argue the case for or against her premiership, whether their views are aired in the comment pages of broadsheet newspapers or the bar lounge of the Dog and Duck.
The first thematic section, headed 'Ecritures de l'histoire', focuses primarily on the recording of history, whether by 'professional' historians (Rene de Lucinge), memorialistes (Charlotte de Mornay), polemicists (Henri Estienne, D'Aubigne), or the grands rhetoriqueurs.