polemic

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po·lem·ic

 (pə-lĕm′ĭk)
n.
1. A controversial argument, especially one refuting or attacking a specific opinion or doctrine.
2. A person engaged in or inclined to controversy, argument, or refutation.
adj. also po·lem·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
Of or relating to a controversy, argument, or refutation.

[French polémique, from Greek polemikos, hostile, from polemos, war.]

po·lem′i·cal·ly adv.

polemic

(pəˈlɛmɪk)
adj
of or involving dispute or controversy
n
1. an argument or controversy, esp over a doctrine, belief, etc
2. a person engaged in such an argument or controversy
[C17: from Medieval Latin polemicus, from Greek polemikos relating to war, from polemos war]
poˈlemically adv
polemicist, polemist n

po•lem•ic

(pəˈlɛm ɪk, poʊ-)

n.
1. a controversial argument, as one against some opinion, doctrine, etc.
2. a person who argues in opposition to another; controversialist.
adj.
3. Also, po•lem′i•cal. of or pertaining to a polemic; controversial.
[1630–40; < Greek polemikós of or for war =pólem(os) war + -ikos -ic]
po•lem′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polemic - a writer who argues in opposition to others (especially in theology)
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
2.polemic - a controversy (especially over a belief or dogma)
contestation, controversy, disceptation, arguing, argument, contention, disputation, tilt - a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
Adj.1.polemic - of or involving dispute or controversy
controversial - marked by or capable of arousing controversy; "the issue of the death penalty is highly controversial"; "Rushdie's controversial book"; "a controversial decision on affirmative action"

polemic

noun
1. argument, attack, debate, dispute, controversy, rant, tirade, diatribe, invective, philippic (rare) a polemic against the danger of secret societies

polemic

noun
A discussion, often heated, in which a difference of opinion is expressed:
Informal: hassle, rhubarb, tangle.
adjective
Translations
polemika

polemic

[pɒˈlemɪk]
A. ADJpolémico
B. Npolémica f

polemic

[pəˈlɛmɪk] npolémique f

polemic

adjpolemisch
nPolemik f

polemic

[pəˈlɛmɪk] npolemica
References in periodicals archive ?
She explores the manner in which colonial historians and polemicists left an intellectual legacy of issues pertaining to colonial legislation, just war, territoriality, and Amerindian rights.
So amidst this tolerant society, where I can wear what I like, we are enjoying much debate in regard to the niqab by the various politicians, political observers, and polemicists that fill up our newspapers with their blather and whatnot.
Next up, advocates and polemicists Robert Engelman and Brendan O'Neill present very different perspectives on what the real issues are.
The culmination of more than a decade of research, much of it conducted "on the ground," Chinese Poetry in Times of Mind, Mayhem and Money strikes a judicious balance between tracing the genealogy of the Chinese avant-garde and profiling the major poets and polemicists who have helped shape that lineage.
We are trying to be as explicit as possible, but we are not polemicists," said Falluel of the focus on fashion during the occupation.
There are many difficulties in this attempt: surviving sources were often by polemicists anxious to score points, not to analyse carefully; Catholics were divided into two--refugees in Europe and those at home who were again divided into those who went to Anglican services and those who did not.
The sources said it is also not easy to convince Jasdaq board directors, who include such polemicists as former officials of the Bank of Japan, the Financial Services Agency and the Public Prosecutors Office.
The theme of confessional conflict is pursued in several essays which discuss the writings of Catholic polemicists like Miles Hogarde and Robert Persons, who challenged Foxe's calendar of Protestant martyrs.
of Bergen, Germany) examines the public debate over investiture and the varied ways polemicists from different periods of the Contest forged their arguments, while also including a Habermasian historical-sociological approach to medieval public sphere formation as a secondary note.
Viewing the emerging complexity of these brain states as a simple dichotomy only feeds the polemicists who see these scientific findings through an ideological prism.
This despite the fact that its meaning has always been nebulous, even to, or especially to, its greatest polemicists.
But, like most polemicists, Davies over-eggs the pudding by excluding (for his own ideological reasons?