polemic

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po·lem·ic

 (pə-lĕm′ĭk)
n.
1. A controversial argument, especially one refuting or attacking a specific opinion or doctrine.
2. A person engaged in or inclined to controversy, argument, or refutation.
adj. also po·lem·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
Of or relating to a controversy, argument, or refutation.

[French polémique, from Greek polemikos, hostile, from polemos, war.]

po·lem′i·cal·ly adv.

polemic

(pəˈlɛmɪk)
adj
of or involving dispute or controversy
n
1. an argument or controversy, esp over a doctrine, belief, etc
2. a person engaged in such an argument or controversy
[C17: from Medieval Latin polemicus, from Greek polemikos relating to war, from polemos war]
poˈlemically adv
polemicist, polemist n

po•lem•ic

(pəˈlɛm ɪk, poʊ-)

n.
1. a controversial argument, as one against some opinion, doctrine, etc.
2. a person who argues in opposition to another; controversialist.
adj.
3. Also, po•lem′i•cal. of or pertaining to a polemic; controversial.
[1630–40; < Greek polemikós of or for war =pólem(os) war + -ikos -ic]
po•lem′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polemic - a writer who argues in opposition to others (especially in theology)
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
2.polemic - a controversy (especially over a belief or dogma)
contestation, controversy, disceptation, arguing, argument, contention, disputation, tilt - a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
Adj.1.polemic - of or involving dispute or controversy
controversial - marked by or capable of arousing controversy; "the issue of the death penalty is highly controversial"; "Rushdie's controversial book"; "a controversial decision on affirmative action"

polemic

noun
1. argument, attack, debate, dispute, controversy, rant, tirade, diatribe, invective, philippic (rare) a polemic against the danger of secret societies

polemic

noun
A discussion, often heated, in which a difference of opinion is expressed:
Informal: hassle, rhubarb, tangle.
adjective
Translations
polemika

polemic

[pɒˈlemɪk]
A. ADJpolémico
B. Npolémica f

polemic

[pəˈlɛmɪk] npolémique f

polemic

adjpolemisch
nPolemik f

polemic

[pəˈlɛmɪk] npolemica
References in periodicals archive ?
This book represents a much needed counter-move to a number of celebrated recent presentations of the doctrine of the Trinity that have polemicized against a doctrine of the immanent Trinity and have floundered because of their failure to understand the importance of this doctrine.
10] As these people witnessed the Revolution's descent into Stalinism and the party's tactical zigzags, many polemicized for years on behalf of various non-Stalinist socialisms, and then in the Cold War gave up on socialism entirely and adopted a variety of political positions fro m liberal to reactionary.
Recent historiographical interpretations of Catholic evangelism are thus polemicized around the relationship between Christian conversion and the wider colonization and assimilation of Aboriginal people which occurred in the late nineteenth century.
Even the anti-rabbinic Karaites polemicized against Christian claims.
Rather, the debate was conducted principally within an arena deeply colored by controversial and polemicized social and cultural issues, a field of action that in its mix of anger, fear, and hope approximates Stephen Crane's notion of a Civil War battlefield.
In tones as aggressive as those of Davidson, he polemicized against the German capital:
He also polemicized against Schelling and Hegel, and in 1815 he wrote a new introduction to David Hume which was intended to serve as an introduction to his works as a whole.
It was natural that the new Catholic missiology in many respects either drew from or polemicized against the "older sister," Protestant missiology.
It was as though he had given up his philosophy of history for something timeless and transcendent, precisely at the moment when quality itself became polemicized as invidious and unacceptable.
Maxwell argues that, rather than attacking the New Negro Renaissance per se, Gold polemicized against what he saw as a pandering exoticism promoted by white patrons such as Carl Van Vechten and Charlotte Osgood Mason.