police power


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police power

n.
The inherent authority of a government to impose restrictions on private rights for the sake of public welfare, order, and security.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Use and Abuse of Police Power in America: Historical Milestones and Current Controversies
It will be a mostly secret intensification of police power, with attendant shrinkage of individual freedoms, Neil Macdonald writes.
It was intended to determine whether the assaults occurred in the context of an officer carrying out a common law police power that in some way connected to common law duties.
Likewise, there being no grant of police power to a state government, the only place state police have police power is on state property, mostly on state roads.
Disturbing the Peace: Black Culture and the Police Power after Slavery.
I see this as an abuse of police power and an infringement of civil liberties.
Police power as a technology for governance is explored by scholars of politics, law, and criminology.
Parker clearly stated that redevelopment is a public purpose, that Congress can use the police power and eminent domain, that all land in a designated redevelopment area can be taken, even if property may be taken from one business owner for the benefit of another.
In An Eviction, 2004 (a remake of his 1998 Eviction Struggle, digitally rendered for this show from previously unused production stills), we witness a man fighting police power like a desperate, lower-class Laocoon.
Plessy represented the expansionist view of the police power that Lochner repudiated.
The purpose of this letter is to suggest a new angle toward achieving proactive economic redevelopment through the marketplace via police power rather than the powers of eminent domain alone.

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