police wagon


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Related to police wagon: police van, paddy wagon

police wagon

n
(Law) US another term for patrol wagon

pad′dy wag`on


n.
an enclosed truck used by the police to transport prisoners.
[1925–30; probably paddy policeman, generic use of Paddy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.police wagon - van used by police to transport prisonerspolice wagon - van used by police to transport prisoners
van - a truck with an enclosed cargo space
References in periodicals archive ?
Drag 'Elsa' just single-handedly pushed out a stuck police wagon," Haynes, who runs a PR company, wrote on the Facebook post along with the video.
Even Big Government neocons got in their shots, with retired General Michael Hayden, the former director of the National Security Agency, telling CNN's Jake Tapper: "If someone else had said that outside the hall, he'd be in the back of a police wagon now with the Secret Service questioning him.
He suffered a neck injury in a police wagon while shackled and handcuffed, and died a week later.
Then I was taken and put in the cage - which is what the back of a police wagon is.
Egyptian writer-director Mohamed Diab is shooting "Clash," set inside a police wagon carrying pro- and anti-Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators.
She detailed what happened to Gray during his arrest and his nearly 45-minute ride in a police wagon, contradicting what police have said on some points and shedding far more light on what happened during his fatal journey.
Baransu gets on the police wagon after medical check
Two tall plainclothes officers pushed the two who crumpled in the back of the shiny police wagon.
We believe it will be just as enlightening as the footage of the disgusting treatment of Frank Paul in 1998, where Vancouver police dragged the drunken Native man out to a police wagon and then abandoned him in an alley in sub-zero temperatures where he later died of hypothermia
We told yesterday how customers in Starbucks in West Nile Street thought they were witnessing a major incident when a police wagon drew up outside on Tuesday.
Brewer''s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable suggests the police wagon was named after a fearsome lady called Maria Lee who kept a boardinghouse in Boston in the 1820s.
As far the sudden stop of the police wagon, he said, "I could've been killed right then and there, and maybe that was the intention--to kill me.