policing


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po·lice

 (pə-lēs′)
n. pl. police
1. (used with a pl. verb)
a. A body of government employees trained in methods of law enforcement and crime prevention and detection and authorized to maintain the peace, safety, and order of the community.
b. A body of persons with a similar organization and function: campus police. Also called police force.
2. Archaic Regulation and control of the affairs of a community, especially with respect to maintenance of order, law, health, morals, safety, and other matters affecting the public welfare.
3. Informal A group that admonishes, cautions, or reminds: grammar police; fashion police.
4.
a. The cleaning of a military base or other military area: Police of the barracks must be completed before inspection.
b. The soldiers assigned to a specified maintenance duty.
tr.v. po·liced, po·lic·ing, po·lic·es
1. To regulate, control, or keep in order with a law enforcement agency or other official group.
2.
a. To impose one's viewpoint or beliefs regarding, especially in an authoritarian way: policing others' comments by implementing speech codes.
b. To critique in a presumptuous or arrogant manner: policed the grammar of everyone who commented on the blog post.
3. To make (a military area, for example) neat in appearance: policed the barracks.

[French, from Old French policie, civil organization, from Late Latin polītīa, from Latin, the State, from Greek polīteia, from polītēs, citizen, from polis, city; see pelə-3 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

po·lice′a·ble adj.
po·lic′er n.

policing

(pəˈliːsɪŋ)
n
(Law) the activities carried out by police officers in order to preserve law and order
Translations

policing

[pəˈliːsɪŋ] N [of area] → mantenimiento m del orden público or del servicio de policía; [of process] → vigilación f, control m

policing

[pəˈliːsɪŋ] n
[place, event] → maintien m de l'ordre
the policing of public places → le maintien de l'ordre dans les endroits publics
(= overseeing) → contrôle m
the policing of new housing developments → le contrôle des travaux de construction de nouveaux logements

policing

n (of road, frontier, territory)Kontrolle f; (of agreement, pop concert also)Überwachung f; new policing policies for sports eventsneue polizeiliche Richtlinien bei Sportveranstaltungen
References in classic literature ?
The Malay and lascar crew divided their time between watch duty on board the Ithaca, policing the camp, and cultivating a little patch of clearing just south of their own campong.
Every year, more law enforcement agencies learn how Operation Chill helps community policing and interaction with their youngest citizens and have signed up.
Seven years after the Rafael Perez scandal rocked the LAPD, the Rampart Division has become transformed into a model of modern policing.
They attribute the success to new policing tactics, such as reinstituting gang intelligence units, installing high-tech security cameras and implementing the "cops on the dots" strategy, which floods high crime areas with previously desk-bound officers.
In Chicago and New York, class action lawsuits brought by activists produced new restrictions on political policing.
You are looking at people who are averaging anywhere from five to 10 years of experience in the policing profession and you don't make up that experience overnight.
Odem, Delinquent Daughters: Protecting and Policing Adolescent Female Sexuality in the United States, 1885-1920 (Chapel Hill, 1995).
The sources include the difficulty in policing victimless crimes in general and the resulting need for intrusive police techniques; the greater relevancy of this difficulty given the intensification of the drug war since the 1980s; and the additional incentive that asset forfeiture laws give police forces to seize money and property from suspects.
Boot's rosy picture of policing in Los Angeles will be sharply contested by many citizens in the City of the Angels, but it will undoubtedly win Dunn accolades from most of his peers.
The twenty-three years since its publication has seen a constantly-accelerating rate of change in the legal framework of policing, in the arrangements for democratic accountability of the police, in the technologies involved in crime and policing, in management structures and methods in the police service, in financial control systems imposed by central government, and in methods of assessing police performance.
TASER continues to define smarter policing with its growing suite of technology solutions, including AXON body-worn video cameras and EVIDENCE.
You cannot have two agencies with primary jurisdiction policing the same entity.