politeness


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po·lite

 (pə-līt′)
adj. po·lit·er, po·lit·est
1. Marked by or showing consideration for others and observance of accepted social usage.
2. Refined; elegant: polite society.

[Middle English polit, polished, from Latin polītus, past participle of polīre, to polish; see polish.]

po·lite′ly adv.
po·lite′ness n.
Synonyms: polite, mannerly, civil, courteous, genteel
These adjectives mean mindful of, conforming to, or marked by good manners. Polite and mannerly imply consideration for others and the adherence to conventional social standards of good behavior: "She was so polite and unwilling to offend that she wouldn't always make her feelings and intentions clear" (Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson)."Just the one young man came out, very mannerly, and helped first her then me down from the car" (Alice Munro).
Civil often suggests the barest observance of accepted social usages, as in the avoidance of rudeness: "Mr. Bingley was unaffectedly civil in his answer, and forced his younger sister to be civil also, and say what the occasion required" (Jane Austen).
Courteous implies courtliness and dignity: "Even around his parents ... he's unfailingly courteous and even-tempered, letting slide their mild attempts to run his life" (Paul Solotaroff).
Genteel, which originally meant well-bred, now usually suggests excessive and affected refinement associated with the upper classes: "In a world without credit bureaus, background checks, or official identification, properly genteel attire, speech, and behavior determined where a person could go, whom he could see, and how he was judged in every area" (Jeffrey L. Pasley).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.politeness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usagepoliteness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usage
good manners, courtesy - a courteous manner
impoliteness - a discourteous manner that ignores accepted social usage
2.politeness - the act of showing regard for others
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
courtesy - a courteous or respectful or considerate act
deference, respect - a courteous expression (by word or deed) of esteem or regard; "his deference to her wishes was very flattering"; "be sure to give my respects to the dean"
devoir - formal expression of respect

politeness

noun courtesy, decency, correctness, etiquette, deference, grace, civility, graciousness, common courtesy, complaisance, courteousness, respectfulness, mannerliness, obligingness She listened to him, but only out of politeness.
Quotations
"Politeness is organized indifference" [Paul Valéry Tel Quel]

politeness

noun
1. Well-mannered behavior toward others:
2. A courteous act or courteous acts that contribute to smoothness and ease in dealings and social relationships
amenity (used in plural), civility, courtesy, pleasantry, propriety (used in plural).
Translations
أدَب، تَهْذيبكِيَاسَة
zdvořilost
høflighedvelopdragenhed
kohteliaisuus
pristojnost
kurteisi
丁寧
정중함
vljudnost
artighet
ความสุภาพอ่อนโยน
vẻ lịch sự

politeness

[pəˈlaɪtnɪs] Ncortesía f, educación f
to do sth out of politenesshacer algo por cortesía

politeness

[pəˈlaɪtnɪs] npolitesse f
to do sth out of politeness → faire qch par politesse

politeness

nHöflichkeit f

politeness

[pəˈlaɪtnɪs] neducazione f, cortesia

polite

(pəˈlait) adjective
having or showing good manners; courteous. a polite child; a polite apology.
poˈlitely adverb
poˈliteness noun

politeness

كِيَاسَة zdvořilost høflighed Höflichkeit ευγένεια cortesía kohteliaisuus politesse pristojnost cortesia 丁寧 정중함 beleefdheid høflighet grzeczność gentileza вежливость artighet ความสุภาพอ่อนโยน kibarlık vẻ lịch sự 有礼
References in classic literature ?
He glanced at her frizzled head, bare shoulders, and fantastically trimmed dress with an expression that abashed her more than his answer, which had not particle of his usual politeness in it.
Cuzak began at once to talk about his holiday--from politeness he spoke in English.
Montcalm has got him, and with the accursed politeness of his nation, he has sent him in with a doleful tale, of 'knowing how I valued the fellow, he could not think of retaining him' A Jesuitical way that, Major Duncan Heyward, of telling a man of his misfortunes
I see you agree with me, that politeness is quite a matter of intention," said Christie, "and not of mere fashion and rules.
Marie lifted her large eyes on her cousin with an air of some curiosity, and received her with languid politeness.
There is something very real about this sort of politeness.
If you have ever observed how courteous and gracious and mannerly you feel when you don a beautiful new frock; if you have ever noticed the feeling of reverence stealing over you when you close your eyes, clasp your hands, and bow your head; if you have ever watched your sense of repulsion toward a fellow creature melt a little under the exercise of daily politeness, you may understand how the adoption of the outward and visible sign has some strange influence in developing the inward and spiritual state of which it is the expression.
As she thought less of his inebriety, she thought more of his inconstancy and presumption; and with fewer struggles for politeness, replied,
The contempt which she had, very early in their acquaintance, felt for her daughter-in-law, was very much increased by the farther knowledge of her character, which half a year's residence in her family afforded; and perhaps in spite of every consideration of politeness or maternal affection on the side of the former, the two ladies might have found it impossible to have lived together so long, had not a particular circumstance occurred to give still greater eligibility, according to the opinions of Mrs.
A reception of finished politeness would probably have confused me: I could not have returned or repaid it by answering grace and elegance on my part; but harsh caprice laid me under no obligation; on the contrary, a decent quiescence, under the freak of manner, gave me the advantage.
In the place where she heard Heathcliff termed a 'vulgar young ruffian,' and 'worse than a brute,' she took care not to act like him; but at home she had small inclination to practise politeness that would only be laughed at, and restrain an unruly nature when it would bring her neither credit nor praise.
Much as usual," said Miss Garth, feeling her resources of politeness fast failing her.