political economy

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political economy

n.
1. The social science that deals with political science and economics as a unified subject; the study of the interrelationships between political and economic processes.
2. The early science of economics through the 1800s.

political economy

n
(Economics) the former name for economics1

polit′ical econ′omy


n.
the science of economics.
[1605–15]

political economy

The social science that studies both politics and economics, and in particular the interrelationship between them.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their managementpolitical economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
production - (economics) manufacturing or mining or growing something (usually in large quantities) for sale; "he introduced more efficient methods of production"
Gresham's Law - (economics) the principle that when two kinds of money having the same denominational value are in circulation the intrinsically more valuable money will be hoarded and the money of lower intrinsic value will circulate more freely until the intrinsically more valuable money is driven out of circulation; bad money drives out good; credited to Sir Thomas Gresham
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
social science - the branch of science that studies society and the relationships of individual within a society
game theory, theory of games - (economics) a theory of competition stated in terms of gains and losses among opposing players
econometrics - the application of mathematics and statistics to the study of economic and financial data
finance - the branch of economics that studies the management of money and other assets
macroeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the overall working of a national economy
microeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firms
supply-side economics - the school of economic theory that stresses the costs of production as a means of stimulating the economy; advocates policies that raise capital and labor output by increasing the incentive to produce
spillover - (economics) any indirect effect of public expenditure
capital account - (economics) that part of the balance of payments recording a nation's outflow and inflow of financial securities
economic consumption, use of goods and services, usance, consumption, use - (economics) the utilization of economic goods to satisfy needs or in manufacturing; "the consumption of energy has increased steadily"
utility - (economics) a measure that is to be maximized in any situation involving choice
marginal utility - (economics) the amount that utility increases with an increase of one unit of an economic good or service
productivity - (economics) the ratio of the quantity and quality of units produced to the labor per unit of time
monopoly - (economics) a market in which there are many buyers but only one seller; "a monopoly on silver"; "when you have a monopoly you can ask any price you like"
monopsony - (economics) a market in which goods or services are offered by several sellers but there is only one buyer
oligopoly - (economics) a market in which control over the supply of a commodity is in the hands of a small number of producers and each one can influence prices and affect competitors
moral hazard - (economics) the lack of any incentive to guard against a risk when you are protected against it (as by insurance); "insurance companies are exposed to a moral hazard if the insured party is not honest"
real - of, relating to, or representing an amount that is corrected for inflation; "real prices"; "real income"; "real wages"
nominal - of, relating to, or characteristic of an amount that is not adjusted for inflation; "the nominal GDP"; "nominal interest rates"
inflationary - associated with or tending to cause increases in inflation; "inflationary prices"
deflationary - associated with or tending to cause decreases in consumer prices or increases in the purchasing power of money; "deflationary measures"
References in classic literature ?
But as I cannot hope for a wholly sympathetic audience--as there may be monks, misogynists, political economists, and other professedly hard-hearted persons present among those whom I now address--I think it best to keep to safe generalities, and to describe my love-making in as few sentences as the vast, though soft, importance of the subject will allow me to use.
Between the idealists, and the political economists, Margaret had a bad time.
Those who, like some political economists, talk in a business-like way about the terrific waste of human life and energy, deliberately overlook the fact that the waste most to be deplored usually occurs among higher individuals.
Go to your meekest little assistant instructor of sociology and ask him what is the difference between Rousseau's theory of the return to nature and the theory of socialism; ask your greatest orthodox bourgeois political economists and sociologists; question through the pages of every text-book written on the subject and stored on the shelves of your subsidized libraries; and from one and all the answer will be that there is nothing congruous between the return to nature and socialism.
Here are ship-captains, criminals, poets, men of science, peers, peasants, political economists, and representatives of dozens of degrees.
National Assembly First Minister, Rhodri Morgan, who knew Lord Shore for almost quarter of a century, described him as one of an outstanding generation of political economists.
Hence, Southern apologist George Fitzhugh said the "Southern Revolution of 1861" was a "solemn protest against the doctrines of natural liberty, human equality and the social contracts as taught by Locke and the American sages of 1776, and an equally solemn protest against the doctrines of Adam Smith, Franklin, Say and Tom Paine and the rest of the infidel, political economists, who maintain that the world is too much governed.
In an excitingly critical and playful think-piece, Walker chides all around: the traditional landscape school for a static and anti-modernist view of culture; new cultural geographers for their cultural idealism; and political economists for their neglect of consumer cultures (p.
In contrast to nineteenth century moral, social, and political economists, eighteenth-century commentators considered women working at home undisciplined and promiscuous.
Sebastiani concludes Part I, the core of his book, by observing that Kalecki is one in the great tradition of political economists, including Marx, Schumpeter, and Keynes, who joined an interest in concrete economic problems with the development of a general interpretive framework of the operation of capitalism; Sebastiani speculates that Kalecki might be the last in that tradition [p.
This wide scope of activities and the importance of the political dimension imply that Bechtel's two corporate economists must really be political economists rather than economic specialists, in spite of the fact that I happily spent most of my pre-Bechtel career as an econometrician or managing econometric studies.
Regulation attracts the interest of many different groups, not the least of which is political economists.

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