political economy


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political economy

n.
1. The social science that deals with political science and economics as a unified subject; the study of the interrelationships between political and economic processes.
2. The early science of economics through the 1800s.

political economy

n
(Economics) the former name for economics1

polit′ical econ′omy


n.
the science of economics.
[1605–15]

political economy

The social science that studies both politics and economics, and in particular the interrelationship between them.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their managementpolitical economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
production - (economics) manufacturing or mining or growing something (usually in large quantities) for sale; "he introduced more efficient methods of production"
Gresham's Law - (economics) the principle that when two kinds of money having the same denominational value are in circulation the intrinsically more valuable money will be hoarded and the money of lower intrinsic value will circulate more freely until the intrinsically more valuable money is driven out of circulation; bad money drives out good; credited to Sir Thomas Gresham
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
social science - the branch of science that studies society and the relationships of individual within a society
game theory, theory of games - (economics) a theory of competition stated in terms of gains and losses among opposing players
econometrics - the application of mathematics and statistics to the study of economic and financial data
finance - the branch of economics that studies the management of money and other assets
macroeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the overall working of a national economy
microeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firms
supply-side economics - the school of economic theory that stresses the costs of production as a means of stimulating the economy; advocates policies that raise capital and labor output by increasing the incentive to produce
spillover - (economics) any indirect effect of public expenditure
capital account - (economics) that part of the balance of payments recording a nation's outflow and inflow of financial securities
economic consumption, use of goods and services, usance, consumption, use - (economics) the utilization of economic goods to satisfy needs or in manufacturing; "the consumption of energy has increased steadily"
utility - (economics) a measure that is to be maximized in any situation involving choice
marginal utility - (economics) the amount that utility increases with an increase of one unit of an economic good or service
productivity - (economics) the ratio of the quantity and quality of units produced to the labor per unit of time
monopoly - (economics) a market in which there are many buyers but only one seller; "a monopoly on silver"; "when you have a monopoly you can ask any price you like"
monopsony - (economics) a market in which goods or services are offered by several sellers but there is only one buyer
oligopoly - (economics) a market in which control over the supply of a commodity is in the hands of a small number of producers and each one can influence prices and affect competitors
moral hazard - (economics) the lack of any incentive to guard against a risk when you are protected against it (as by insurance); "insurance companies are exposed to a moral hazard if the insured party is not honest"
real - of, relating to, or representing an amount that is corrected for inflation; "real prices"; "real income"; "real wages"
nominal - of, relating to, or characteristic of an amount that is not adjusted for inflation; "the nominal GDP"; "nominal interest rates"
inflationary - associated with or tending to cause increases in inflation; "inflationary prices"
deflationary - associated with or tending to cause decreases in consumer prices or increases in the purchasing power of money; "deflationary measures"
References in classic literature ?
And yet the former history continues to be studied side by side with the laws of statistics, geography, political economy, comparative philology, and geology, which directly contradict its assumptions.
Do you understand Political Economy and the Laws of Supply and Demand?
In the earlier series of books containing, among others, Bosanquet's "History of Aesthetic," Pfleiderer's "Rational Theology since Kant," Albee's "History of English Utilitarianism," Bonar's "Philosophy and Political Economy," Brett's "History of Psychology," Ritchie's "Natural Rights," these objects were to a large extent effected.
He had come to feel with increasing indignation that the modern industrial system, the materialistic political economy founded on it, and the whole modern organization of society reduce the mass of men to a state of intellectual, social, and religious squalor and blindness, and that while they continue in this condition it is of little use to talk to them about Beauty.
I was taught a lesson in political economy in Frankfort.
I joined the socialist local where we studied and orated political economy, philosophy, and politics.
I'm not talking of political economy, I'm talking of the science of agriculture.
Such a wife might awaken you some fine morning with a new scheme for the application of her income which would interfere with political economy and the keeping of saddle-horses: a man would naturally think twice before he risked himself in such fellowship.
But Helen was now down in the dining-room preparing a speech about political economy.
Body number two, said they must take everything on political economy.
They haven't no more philosophy nor political economy about 'em than that,' said the beadle, snapping his fingers contemptuously.
French and German works predominated, the old French dramatists, sundry modern authors, Thiers, Villemain, Paul de Kock, George Sand, Eugene Sue; in German--Goethe, Schiller, Zschokke, Jean Paul Richter; in English there were works on Political Economy.

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