pollard


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pol·lard

 (pŏl′ərd)
n.
1. A tree whose top branches have been cut back to the trunk so that it may produce a dense growth of new shoots.
2. An animal, such as an ox, goat, or sheep, that no longer has its horns.
tr.v. pol·lard·ed, pol·lard·ing, pol·lards
To convert or make into a pollard.

[From poll.]

pollard

(ˈpɒləd)
n
1. (Animals) an animal, such as a sheep or deer, that has either shed its horns or antlers or has had them removed
2. (Botany) a tree that has had its top cut off to encourage the formation of a crown of branches
vb
(Horticulture) (tr) to convert into a pollard; poll
[C16: hornless animal; see poll]

pol•lard

(ˈpɒl ərd)

n.
1. a tree cut back nearly to the trunk, so as to produce a dense mass of branches.
2. a hornless stag, ox, sheep, etc.
v.t.
3. to make a pollard of.
[1515–25]

pollard


Past participle: pollarded
Gerund: pollarding

Imperative
pollard
pollard
Present
I pollard
you pollard
he/she/it pollards
we pollard
you pollard
they pollard
Preterite
I pollarded
you pollarded
he/she/it pollarded
we pollarded
you pollarded
they pollarded
Present Continuous
I am pollarding
you are pollarding
he/she/it is pollarding
we are pollarding
you are pollarding
they are pollarding
Present Perfect
I have pollarded
you have pollarded
he/she/it has pollarded
we have pollarded
you have pollarded
they have pollarded
Past Continuous
I was pollarding
you were pollarding
he/she/it was pollarding
we were pollarding
you were pollarding
they were pollarding
Past Perfect
I had pollarded
you had pollarded
he/she/it had pollarded
we had pollarded
you had pollarded
they had pollarded
Future
I will pollard
you will pollard
he/she/it will pollard
we will pollard
you will pollard
they will pollard
Future Perfect
I will have pollarded
you will have pollarded
he/she/it will have pollarded
we will have pollarded
you will have pollarded
they will have pollarded
Future Continuous
I will be pollarding
you will be pollarding
he/she/it will be pollarding
we will be pollarding
you will be pollarding
they will be pollarding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pollarding
you have been pollarding
he/she/it has been pollarding
we have been pollarding
you have been pollarding
they have been pollarding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pollarding
you will have been pollarding
he/she/it will have been pollarding
we will have been pollarding
you will have been pollarding
they will have been pollarding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pollarding
you had been pollarding
he/she/it had been pollarding
we had been pollarding
you had been pollarding
they had been pollarding
Conditional
I would pollard
you would pollard
he/she/it would pollard
we would pollard
you would pollard
they would pollard
Past Conditional
I would have pollarded
you would have pollarded
he/she/it would have pollarded
we would have pollarded
you would have pollarded
they would have pollarded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pollard - a tree with limbs cut back to promote a more bushy growth of foliagepollard - a tree with limbs cut back to promote a more bushy growth of foliage
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
2.pollard - a usually horned animal that has either shed its horns or had them removed
ruminant - any of various cud-chewing hoofed mammals having a stomach divided into four (occasionally three) compartments
Verb1.pollard - convert into a pollard; "pollard trees"
prune, snip, lop, cut back, clip, crop, trim, dress - cultivate, tend, and cut back the growth of; "dress the plants in the garden"
Translations

pollard

[ˈpɒləd]
A. Nárbol m desmochado
B. VTdesmochar

pollard

n (= tree)gekappter Baum
vtkappen
References in classic literature ?
Being returned home at last, Captain Pollard once more sailed for the Pacific in command of another ship, but the gods shipwrecked him again upon unknown rocks and breakers; for the second time his ship was utterly lost, and forthwith forswearing the sea, he has never tempted it since.
When I came to the stile, I stopped a minute, looked round and listened, with an idea that a horse's hoofs might ring on the causeway again, and that a rider in a cloak, and a Gytrash-like Newfoundland dog, might be again apparent: I saw only the hedge and a pollard willow before me, rising up still and straight to meet the moonbeams; I heard only the faintest waft of wind roaming fitful among the trees round Thornfield, a mile distant; and when I glanced down in the direction of the murmur, my eye, traversing the hall-front, caught a light kindling in a window: it reminded me that I was late, and I hurried on.
Next day he moved into a pollard willow near the lake, frightening the wild ducks and the water rats.
Nothing was to be seen save flat meadows, cows feeding unconcernedly for the most part, and silvery pollard willows motionless in the warm sunlight.
Green, reedy swamps; fields fertile but flat, cultivated in patches that made them look like magnified kitchen-gardens; belts of cut trees, formal as pollard willows, skirting the horizon; narrow canals, gliding slow by the road-side; painted Flemish farmhouses; some very dirty hovels; a gray, dead sky; wet road, wet fields, wet house-tops: not a beautiful, scarcely a picturesque object met my eye along the whole route; yet to me, all was beautiful, all was more than picturesque.
At last she got away, and did not stop in her retreat till she was in the thicket of pollard willows at the lower side of the barton, where she could be quite unseen.
Just before the window was a row of pollard trees, looking black on one side and with a silvery light on the other.
Pollard (in Chaucer's English, suitable only for grown-up readers).
On his 'days out,' those flecks of light in his flat vista of pollard old men,' it was at once Mrs Plornish's delight and sorrow, when he was strong with meat, and had taken his full halfpenny-worth of porter, to say, 'Sing us a song, Father.
I do not often walk this way now," said Emma, as they proceeded, "but then there will be an inducement, and I shall gradually get intimately acquainted with all the hedges, gates, pools and pollards of this part of Highbury.
I pointed to where our village lay, on the flat in-shore among the alder-trees and pollards, a mile or more from the church.
There was a little stream, with pollards on both sides of it, that ran through green fields, and it made him happy, he knew not why, to wander along its banks.