pollock


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pol·lock

or pol·lack  (pŏl′ək)
n. pl. pollock or pol·locks also pollack or pol·lacks
Any of various marine food fishes of the genera Pollachius and Theragra, closely related to the cod, especially T. chalcogramma of northern Pacific waters, often used for manufactured fish products.

[Middle English poullok, the Atlantic pollock (Pollachius pollachius), of unknown origin.]

Pollock

(ˈpɒlək)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Frederick. 1845–1937, English legal scholar: with Maitland, he wrote History of English Law before the Time of Edward I (1895)
2. (Biography) Jackson. 1912–56, US abstract expressionist painter; chief exponent of action painting in the US

pol•lock

(ˈpɒl ək)

n., pl. -locks, (esp. collectively) -lock.
1. a greenish North Atlantic food fish, Pollachius virens, of the cod family, with a white lateral stripe and a jutting lower jaw.
2. Also, pollack. a related, brownish food fish, P. pollachius.
[1495–1505; assimilated variant of podlok (Scots); akin to Scots paddle lumpfish; see -ock]

Pol•lock

(ˈpɒl ək)

n.
1. Sir Frederick, 1845–1937, English legal scholar and author.
2. Jackson, 1912–56, U.S. painter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pollock - United States artist famous for painting with a drip techniquePollock - United States artist famous for painting with a drip technique; a leader of abstract expressionism in America (1912-1956)
2.pollock - lean white flesh of North Atlantic fish; similar to codfish
Pollachius pollachius, pollack, pollock - important food and game fish of northern seas (especially the northern Atlantic); related to cod
saltwater fish - flesh of fish from the sea used as food
3.pollock - important food and game fish of northern seas (especially the northern Atlantic)pollock - important food and game fish of northern seas (especially the northern Atlantic); related to cod
gadoid, gadoid fish - a soft-finned fish of the family Gadidae
pollack, pollock - lean white flesh of North Atlantic fish; similar to codfish
Translations
seiti
lieu jaune
lyr
References in classic literature ?
As yet, they have not insisted on our estimating Lamar" tine by the cubic foot, or Pollock by the pound -- but what else are we to infer from their continual plating about "sustained effort"?
IT WAS 1950, and while Jackson Pollock may have been America's most famous living artist, it appears - according to the narrative behind this new summer show at Tate Liverpool - that he wasn't entirely happy.
Pollock as the Company's founding President and Chief Scientific Officer.
Keith Pollock pounced on the 16-year-old as she walked home in the early hours.
Lou Pollock Building & Remodeling recently launched a Web site with a fully formatted mobile version in order to accommodate the increased frequency in mobile Web browsing.
28 ( ANI ): Former South African Test captain Ali Bacher has said that his teammate Graeme Pollock, who celebrated his 70th birthday this Thursday, was an unparalleled batsman.
Students from Coundon Court School and Community College were given a playwriting masterclass by Pollock, whose play is back at the Belgrade Theatre by popular demand until October 19.
In this, Henri reinforces what has become a standard historical genealogy, in which Kaprow's interpretation of Pollock subtends his status as the "central figure" of postwar environments and performance.
Charles Pollock, 35, walked free last Tuesday from Belfast Crown Court, after agreeing to 18 months on probation for two offences of driving whilst disqualified and dangerous driving on separate dates in 2009.
Belfast Recorder Judge Tom Burgess told 35-yearold Charles Pollock he was taking account of the fact he had already served the equivalent of a 21-month sentence on remand.
The Crown Office originally targeted pounds 300,000 worth of assets linked to James Pollock after he was jailed on 10 charges of reset in 2005.
Cannibalism is thought to be an influential top-down process affecting walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) recruitment in the eastern Bering Sea (EBS).