polls


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

poll

 (pōl)
n.
1. The casting and registering of votes in an election.
2. The number of votes cast or recorded.
3. polls
a. The places where votes are cast and registered during an election, considered as a group: The polls close in this state at 8:00.
b. A place where votes are cast and registered: I went to the polls before work to cast a vote.
4. A survey of the public or of a sample of public opinion to acquire information.
5. The head, especially the top of the head where hair grows.
6. The blunt or broad end of a tool such as a hammer or axe.
v. polled, poll·ing, polls
v.tr.
1. To receive (a given number of votes).
2. To receive or record the votes of: polling a jury.
3. To cast (a vote or ballot).
4. To question in a survey; canvass.
5. To cut off or trim (hair, horns, or wool, for example); clip.
6. To trim or cut off the hair, wool, branches, or horns of: polled the sheep; polled the trees.
v.intr.
To vote at the polls in an election.

[Middle English pol, head, from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch.]

poll′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polls - the place where people votepolls - the place where people vote    
position, place - the particular portion of space occupied by something; "he put the lamp back in its place"
References in classic literature ?
They would probably send the regiment to the polls forthwith and examine their own consciences as to their duty to Erin; but they would never be easy any more.
I remember standing at the polls one day when the anger of the political contest gave a certain grimness to the faces of the independent electors, and a good man at my side, looking on the people, remarked, "I am satisfied that the largest part of these men, on either side, mean to vote right.
He said things that no doctor should say to another, but which a politician may well say, and has often said, to another politician--things which cannot bear repeating, if, for no other reason, because they are too humiliating and too little conducive to pride for the average American citizen to know; things of the inside, secret governments of imperial municipalities which the average American citizen, voting free as a king at the polls, fondly thinks he manages; things which are, on rare occasion, partly unburied and promptly reburied in the tomes of reports of Lexow Committees and Federal Commissions.
With every roll of the ship the long rows of sitting Celestials would sway forward brokenly, and her headlong dives knocked together the line of shaven polls from end to end.
On the doorsteps there were lounging footmen with bright parti-coloured plumage and white polls, like an extinct race of monstrous birds; and butlers, solitary men of recluse demeanour, each of whom appeared distrustful of all other butlers.
Laurie enjoyed that immensely, and when she told about the prim old gentleman who came once to woo Aunt March, and in the middle of a fine speech, how Poll had tweaked his wig off to his great dismay, the boy lay back and laughed till the tears ran down his cheeks, and a maid popped her head in to see what was the matter.
Now, to white eyes there is no difference between this bit of skin and that of any other Indian, and yet the Sagamore declares it came from the poll of a Mingo; nay, he even names the tribe of the poor devil, with as much ease as if the scalp was the leaf of a book, and each hair a letter.
My boy, Liberty does not come from colors, they only show party, and all the liberty you can get out of them is, liberty to get drunk at other people's expense, liberty to ride to the poll in a dirty old cab, liberty to abuse any one that does not wear your color, and to shout yourself hoarse at what you only half-understand -- that's your liberty
He must be a fool, for he contested the last Birmingham election, and came out at the foot of the poll with thirty-two votes through calling himself a Social Democrat or some such foreign rubbish, instead of saying out like a man that he was a Radical.
Trelawney (that, you will remember, was the squire's name) had got up from his seat and was striding about the room, and the doctor, as if to hear the better, had taken off his powdered wig and sat there looking very strange indeed with his own close-cropped black poll.
There was besides in the inn, as servant, an Asturian lass with a broad face, flat poll, and snub nose, blind of one eye and not very sound in the other.
As to poll taxes, I, without scruple, confess my disapprobation of them; and though they have prevailed from an early period in those States[1] which have uniformly been the most tenacious of their rights, I should lament to see them introduced into practice under the national government.