pollster


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to pollster: Rasmussen

poll·ster

 (pōl′stər)
n.
One that takes public-opinion surveys.
Word History: The suffix -ster is used to make nouns referring to persons and can be found in a variety of words that are part of the current vocabulary of English, such as hipster, huckster, jokester, pollster, and youngster. Some of these nouns can refer to either males or females, while others typically denote males. Originally in Old English, however, the suffix (then spelled -estre) was used to form feminine agent nouns. Hoppestre, for example, meant "female dancer" and was the feminine corresponding to the masculine hoppere, "dancer" (that is, a " hopper," so to speak). The suffix -estre was occasionally applied to men in Old English, but mostly to translate Latin masculine nouns denoting occupations that were usually held by women in Anglo-Saxon society. An example is bæcester, "baker," glossing Latin pistor; it survives as the Modern English name Baxter. In Middle English its use as a masculine suffix became more common in northern England, while in the south it remained limited to feminines. In time the masculine usage became dominant throughout the country, and old feminines in -ster were refashioned by adding the newer feminine suffix -ess (borrowed from French) to them, such as seamstress remade from seamster. In Modern English, the only noun ending in -ster with a feminine referent is spinster, which originally meant "a woman who spins thread."

pollster

(ˈpəʊlstə)
n
a person who conducts opinion polls

poll•ster

(ˈpoʊl stər)

n.
one who conducts public-opinion polls.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pollster - someone who conducts surveys of public opinion; "a pollster conducts public opinion polls"; "a headcounter counts heads"
asker, enquirer, inquirer, querier, questioner - someone who asks a question
Translations
anketar

pollster

[ˈpəʊlstəʳ] Nencuestador(a) m/f

pollster

[ˈpəʊlstər] nsondeur m, enquêteur/euse m/fpoll taker n (US)sondeur mpoll tax n (British) (formerly)impôts mpl locaux

pollster

nMeinungsforscher(in) m(f)

pollster

[ˈpəʊlstəʳ] nchi esegue sondaggi d'opinione
References in periodicals archive ?
The firm was originally founded by Lou Harris in 1963, who was pollster to president John F.
But I still back the words of US pollster Frank Luntz, who spoke so well to Jon Snow on Channel 4 News (Tuesday), ahead of the result.
At a meeting with members of the Foreign Press Center's tour entitled "Youth and Politics," including a reporter from TAP news agency, John Zogby, Founder of the "Zogby Poll" and an internationally respected pollster decreed by the Washington Post as "The Maverick Predictor," said that the two candidates are sitting neck-and-neck in the polls.
Moscow, Dhu-AlHijjah 06, 1437, September 07, 2016, SPA -- Russia's Justice Ministry has labelled the country's most esteemed independent pollster, Levada Center, as a foreign agent, the Interfax news agency reported Monday, according to dpa.
POLLSTER YouGov has said it is benefiting from the fall in the value of the pound, adding that its full-year results will now come in ahead of expectations.
Almost every top pollster and bookmaker had the Remain side as huge favourites as polling closed.
During a recent foray into a poll bound state where I was visiting a friend, I was accosted by one such pollster who gave me a choice between Rahul and Modi for PM.
We have an intensity advantage," Romney's campaign pollster Neil Newhouse said, adding: "And you know what?
Kay's former business associate at ATI Fred Steeper served as campaign pollster for both Presidents Bush.
First, those who oppose Barack Obama because of his race can certainly find other ways to dress that up for a pollster.
One pollster reckons that 20 per cent of voters are still claiming they're undecided which way to go.