polyadic

polyadic

(ˌpɒlɪˈædɪk)
adj
(Mathematics) logic maths (of a relation, operation, etc) having several argument places, as … movesfromto …, which might be represented as Mpox1y1z1t1x2y2z2t2 where p names a person, o an object, and each t a time, and each <x,y,z> the coordinates of a place
[C20: modelled on monadic]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The workshop covered various facets of knowledge management such as ontologies applied to access complex data in bioimaging or to local self-government, conceptual navigation and e-learning systems that use polyadic formal concepts, automatic selection of talents for collaborative new product design, self-organizing maps applied to RFM analysis in the packaging industry, selection of software for business intelligence, platforms for city dwellers, AI enhancing intelligent use of energy, segmentation of social networks, and semantic reasoning in knowledge management systems.
It addresses problems like representativeness, comparison in a temporal context, assessment of dyadic or polyadic relations, and interactions between individuals and households, among others.
While Crystal's categorization is very useful from a linguistic semantics standpoint (the focus on a triadic relation among conventionality, language, and to what it refers), from the perspective of linguistic pragmatics (the focus on a polyadic relation among conventionality, speaker, situation, and hearer), however, Stephen Levinson suggests the following "tripartite classification of metaphors": (6)
In 1927, Hitchcock [13, 14] proposed the idea of the polyadic form of a tensor, that is, expressing a tensor as a sum of a finite number of rank-one tensors.
Ar (Espanol Coloquial de Argentina)--on which the present work is based--is formed by 60 dyadic and polyadic casual conversations between university students from different universities in Argentina, aged 18-28.
The behaviour is specified by using a modal logic of actions and a dialect of the polyadic [pi]-calculus.
110) Leibniz's reducibility thesis amounts to something like the following: semantically, all polyadic or two-place predicates are ultimately reducible to monadic or one-place predicates.
It follows that syntactic heads can have only one argument (of course LI's themselves can be polyadic, like give above, but in that case they will unfold into a series of successive projections, e.
Vitality analysis of monadic and polyadic pollen grains using optical contrast-fluorescence microscopy.
Similarly for polyadic connections--A to B, C, D, etc.
A crucial part of what makes this possible is that while Kant had only general logic, Frege had discovered higher-order polyadic quantificational logic.