polychrome

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Related to polychroming: Polychrome sculpture

pol·y·chrome

 (pŏl′ē-krōm′)
adj.
1. Having many or various colors; polychromatic.
2. Made or decorated in many or various colors: polychrome tiles.
n.
An object or a work composed of or decorated in many colors.

polychrome

(ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊm)
adj
1. (General Physics) having various or changing colours; polychromatic
2. (Colours) made with or decorated in various colours
n
(Art Terms) a work of art or artefact in many colours

pol•y•chrome

(ˈpɒl iˌkroʊm)

adj., v. -chromed, -chrom•ing,
n. adj.
1. being of many or various colors.
2. decorated or executed in many colors, as a statue, vase, or mural.
v.t.
3. to paint in many or various colors.
n.
4. a polychrome object or work.
[1795–1805; earlier polychrom < German < Greek polýchrōmos many-colored = poly- poly- + -chrōmos, adj. derivative of chrôma color]

polychrome

Of many or various colors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polychrome - a piece of work composed of or decorated in many colors
piece of work, work - a product produced or accomplished through the effort or activity or agency of a person or thing; "it is not regarded as one of his more memorable works"; "the symphony was hailed as an ingenious work"; "he was indebted to the pioneering work of John Dewey"; "the work of an active imagination"; "erosion is the work of wind or water over time"
Verb1.polychrome - color with many colors; make polychrome
color, color in, colorise, colorize, colour in, colourise, colourize, colour - add color to; "The child colored the drawings"; "Fall colored the trees"; "colorize black and white film"
Adj.1.polychrome - having or exhibiting many colors
colored, coloured, colorful - having color or a certain color; sometimes used in combination; "colored crepe paper"; "the film was in color"; "amber-colored heads of grain"

polychrome

adjective
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Person began by transforming his house and fence, carving nearly every wood surface and polychroming it all with cast-off paint, wax crayons, and simple, jury-rigged tools, some of which were on display here.