polychromy


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pol·y·chro·my

 (pŏl′ē-krō′mē)
n.
The use of many colors in decoration, especially in architecture and sculpture.

polychromy

(ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊmɪ)
n
(Art Terms) decoration in many colours, esp in architecture or sculpture

pol•y•chro•my

(ˈpɒl iˌkroʊ mi)

n.
the art of employing many colors in decoration, as in painting.
[1855–60]
pol`y•chro′mous, adj.

polychromy

the art of using many or various colors in painting, architecture, etc. — polychromie, polychromatic, adj.polychromatist, n.
See also: Art
Translations

polychromy

[ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊmɪ] npolicromia
References in periodicals archive ?
The examination of the surface and the sequence of layers in the cross sections and their appearance under the microscope clearly verify that the paints represent the first or original polychromy.
I knew, in the abstract, of the original polychromy that had hidden the raw masonry from view; in the 1980s, a German art historian, Jurgen Michler, had demonstrated beyond doubt that the church's interior was originally painted in a light ochre, with regular false masonry added in white, a scheme that often bore little resemblance to the coursing of the underlying ashlar stonework.
Polychromy was thus understood as a powerful element of creation, with the capacity to affect transformations of the recipient deity or king, including revitalization, rebirth, and divinization.
If Travers could have had his way these would have been white-washed so that his 1926 baroque sanctuary would have had a plain background to set it off, just as he did with Butterfield's polychromy at St Augustine's in Kensington.
An almost hallucinatory polychromy is already present in his glazed ceramics of the '30s, made in Albisola, Italy, the seaside town known for its artisanal Mazzotti pottery factory, where he would return many times to work.
By way of proof, he examines Josephus's portrayal of the biblical "architect," explores Caligula's troubled relationship with the Jews, unearths Rabbinic memory, analyzes polychromy and the Kusrakem Temple, examines study houses in later antique Palestine, examines synagogue mosaics that included the sun god and the zodiac, looks at priestly power in the synagogue, explores the menorah v.
Haec aurea templa: The Palatine temple of Apollo and its polychromy.
She links social change with shifts in colour technologies and aesthetics, noting for example that the introduction of polychromy coincides with the rise of divine kingship during the Preclassic, while fourth-century contact with the great Central Mexican metropolis of Teotihuacan added a wider range of hues to the earthier palette of Early Classic Maya vessels.
The polychromy accentuates the sculpture's human qualities and encourages the spectator to imagine a moment in Christ's life when he turned to his mother for comfort, which she provides by wrapping him in her mantle (an iconographic motif that evokes representations of the Madonna of Mercy).
Dark iroko floors and simple plastered walls transform the exhibition spaces into suitably neutral receptacles for the often riotous polychromy and gilding of the medieval Christian sculpture pantheon.
Wood with lacquer and polychromy, Late LeDynasty, promised gift of Dr.
It's amazing how endemic the idea of a white, colorless antiquity is," says Roberta Panzanelli, co-curator of "The Color of Life: Polychromy in Sculpture From Antiquity to the Present," a myth-debunking exhibition on display at the Getty Villa in Pacific Palisades.