polychromy


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pol·y·chro·my

 (pŏl′ē-krō′mē)
n.
The use of many colors in decoration, especially in architecture and sculpture.

polychromy

(ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊmɪ)
n
(Art Terms) decoration in many colours, esp in architecture or sculpture

pol•y•chro•my

(ˈpɒl iˌkroʊ mi)

n.
the art of employing many colors in decoration, as in painting.
[1855–60]
pol`y•chro′mous, adj.

polychromy

the art of using many or various colors in painting, architecture, etc. — polychromie, polychromatic, adj.polychromatist, n.
See also: Art
Translations

polychromy

[ˈpɒlɪˌkrəʊmɪ] npolicromia
References in periodicals archive ?
There is the sadly faded polychromy on the limestone figures of Claus Sluter's Well of Moses (1395-1404) in Dijon, documented as Maelwael's work in the detailed records of the commission; and, strictly, that is it.
It has been a place of discovery--not just of the polychromy of the arch menorah, but also of the many paths and palimpsest that are the menorah.
The African features are emphasized by the surviving remains of the old polychromy.
If these cool hues evoke the color schemes of postwar German consumer culture (in ways reminiscent of some of Blinky Palermo's fabric paintings, for example), their source was in fact something significantly more highbrow: the lush polychromy of Le Corbusier's famous housing block Unite d'Habitation in Marseille.
Polychromy was thus understood as a powerful element of creation, with the capacity to affect transformations of the recipient deity or king, including revitalization, rebirth, and divinization.
The Tinted Venus by the nineteenth-century English artist John Gibson, which likely replicates the original polychromy of the Knidia, has been described by John Boardman (2004, 52 and Fig.
If Travers could have had his way these would have been white-washed so that his 1926 baroque sanctuary would have had a plain background to set it off, just as he did with Butterfield's polychromy at St Augustine's in Kensington.
Among the topics are Mishnah Baba Metsia 7:7 and the relationship of Mishnaic Hebrew to northern biblical Hebrew, Tosefta Ma'aser Sheni 1:4--the rabbis and Roman civic coinage in late antique Palestine, Jerusalem Talmud Sanhedrin 2,6 (20c)--the demise of King Solomon and Roman imperial propaganda in late antiquity, polychromy and the Jerusalem temple in late antiquity, and the Rehov inscriptions and rabbinic literature.
By way of proof, he examines Josephus's portrayal of the biblical "architect," explores Caligula's troubled relationship with the Jews, unearths Rabbinic memory, analyzes polychromy and the Kusrakem Temple, examines study houses in later antique Palestine, examines synagogue mosaics that included the sun god and the zodiac, looks at priestly power in the synagogue, explores the menorah v.
Using beautiful polychromy and simplified human form they both denote, essentially through reading and religion, the process of being steered into a social system.
Haec aurea templa: The Palatine temple of Apollo and its polychromy.
The polychromy accentuates the sculpture's human qualities and encourages the spectator to imagine a moment in Christ's life when he turned to his mother for comfort, which she provides by wrapping him in her mantle (an iconographic motif that evokes representations of the Madonna of Mercy).