polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon


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polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

n. Abbr. PAH
Any of a class of carcinogenic organic molecules that consist of three or more benzene rings and are commonly produced by fossil fuel combustion. Also called polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon.
References in periodicals archive ?
A review on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions from energy generation // Environ.
BACKGROUND: Inhalation is one of the main means of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because of their ubiquitous presence in the atmosphere.
Contract notice: Investigations prior to the work to determine the presence of asbestos and / or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt.
dep506gc floor Market survey, geotechnical and soil recognitions, analyzes and laboratory tests, diagnosis asbestos and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, external controls of road works on the territory of the Eurometropolis Strasbourg and the city of Strasbourg.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are created when carbon-containing materials such as wood, oil, garbage or coal is burned,(http://www.
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of multiphasic organic compounds composed of two or more fused aromatic rings.
The quantitative determination of our aim target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compound, anthracene was done by external calibration curve method.
Mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan.
Prenatal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure and child behavior at age 6-7 years.
it not only successfully cleaned up the rust-coloured crude oil, but also adsorbed toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon vapours reportedly sickening oil spill clean-up crew members.
Coal tar-based sealcoat--the black, shiny emulsion painted or sprayed on asphalt pavement--has extremely elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and can affect the quality of downstream water resources, according to a recent joint study in Texas by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and the city of Austin.
An initial characterization study conducted by engineering and environmental firm the Louis Berger Group found asbestos, dioxin, lead, quartz, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulverized glass in dust samples taken from inside the building, health-damaging substances that elucidate the need for careful cleanup procedures.