polyglot

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pol·y·glot

 (pŏl′ē-glŏt′)
adj.
Speaking, writing, written in, or composed of several languages.
n.
1. A person having a speaking, reading, or writing knowledge of several languages.
2. A book, especially a Bible, containing several versions of the same text in different languages.
3. A mixture or confusion of languages.

[French polyglotte, from Greek poluglōttos : polu-, poly- + glōtta, tongue, language.]

pol′y·glot′ism, pol′y·glot′tism n.

polyglot

(ˈpɒlɪˌɡlɒt)
adj
1. having a command of many languages
2. written in, composed of, or containing many languages
n
3. a person with a command of many languages
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a book, esp a Bible, containing several versions of the same text written in various languages
5. a mixture or confusion of languages
[C17: from Greek poluglōttos literally: many-tongued, from poly- + glōtta tongue]
ˈpolyˌglotism, ˈpolyˌglottism n

pol•y•glot

(ˈpɒl iˌglɒt)

adj.
1. able to speak or write several languages; multilingual.
2. containing, composed of, or written in several languages.
n.
3. a mixture or confusion of languages.
4. a person who speaks, writes, or reads several languages.
5. (often cap.) a book, esp. a Bible, containing the same text in several languages.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin polyglōttus < Greek polýglōttos many-tongued]
pol′y•glot`ism, n.

polyglot

- Meaning "written in or knowing many languages," it is from Greek polu-, "many," and glotto, "tongue."
See also related terms for knowing.

polyglot

1. a person who speaks several languages.
2. a mixture of languages. See also books. — polyglot, n., adj. — polyglottic, polyglottous, adj.
See also: Language
a book written in several languages. See also language. — polyglot, polyglottic, polyglottous, adj.
See also: Books
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polyglot - a person who speaks more than one language
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
bilingual, bilingualist - a person who speaks two languages fluently
transcriber, translator - a person who translates written messages from one language to another
Adj.1.polyglot - having a command of or composed in many languages; "a polyglot traveler"; "a polyglot Bible contains versions in different languages"
multilingual - using or knowing more than one language; "a multilingual translator"; "a multilingual nation"
Translations
polyglot
monikielinen
meertaligpolyglot

polyglot

[ˈpɒlɪglɒt]
A. ADJpolígloto
B. Npolígloto/a m/f

polyglot

[ˈpɒliglɒt]
adj (= multilingual) → polyglotte
n (= person) → polyglotte m/f

polyglot

n (= person)Polyglotte(r) mf

polyglot

[ˈpɒlɪˌglɒt] adj & npoliglotta (m/f)
References in classic literature ?
I could hear a lot of words often repeated, queer words, for there were many nationalities in the crowd, so I quietly got my polyglot dictionary from my bag and looked them out.
I have heard some of them talk vigorous sense--yea, I have been present at polyglot discussions in the old, oak-lined dining-room at Hunsden Wood, where a singular insight was given of the sentiments entertained by resolute minds respecting old northern despotisms, and old southern superstitions: also, I have heard much twaddle, enounced chiefly in French and Deutsch, but let that pass.
In England they missed the alien tongues of Continental streets that reminded them of their own polyglot cities.
For a long time past he had been applying himself to the study of the Arab language and the various Mandingoe idioms, and, thanks to his talents as a polyglot, he had made rapid progress.
To the left of the entrance has been fixed the ancient bas-relief, in white marble, of Homer; to the right, the polyglot Bible rears its seven heads.
In one quarter, palaces of marble, laced and, crowned with light and flame and flowers, towered up into her marvellous twilights beautiful, beyond description; in another, a black and sinister polyglot population sweltered in indescribable congestion in warrens, and excavations beyond the power and knowledge of government.
Prince Andrew, listening to this polyglot talk and to these surmises, plans, refutations, and shouts, felt nothing but amazement at what they were saying.
He talked only when he had to, and then his speech was like his walk to the table, filled with jerks and halts as he groped in his polyglot vocabulary for words, debating over words he knew were fit but which he feared he could not pronounce, rejecting other words he knew would not be understood or would be raw and harsh.
Above this a polyglot babel of signs struggled to indicate the abodes of palmists, dressmakers, musicians and doctors.
Kirsch emerging presently from the neighbourhood of the hold, where he had been bellowing instructions intermingled with polyglot oaths to the ship's men engaged in secreting the passengers' luggage, came to give an account of himself to his brother interpreters.
Polyglot, of unknown parentage, of indefinite nationality, anarchist, with a pedantic and ferocious temperament, and an amazingly inflammatory capacity for invective, he was a power in the background, this violent pamphleteer clamouring for revolutionary justice, this Julius Laspara, editor of the