polyphony

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Related to polyphonies: polyphonic music

po·lyph·o·ny

 (pə-lĭf′ə-nē)
n. pl. po·lyph·o·nies
Music with two or more independent melodic parts sounded together.

po·lyph′o·nous adj.
po·lyph′o·nous·ly adv.

polyphony

(pəˈlɪfənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Music, other) polyphonic style of composition or a piece of music utilizing it
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) the use of polyphones in a writing system
[C19: from Greek poluphōnia diversity of tones, from poly- + phōnē speech, sound]
poˈlyphonous adj
poˈlyphonously adv

po•lyph•o•ny

(pəˈlɪf ə ni)

n.
1. a musical technique or style in which two or more melodic lines are in equitable juxtaposition.
2. representation of different sounds by the same letter or symbol.
[1820–30; < Greek polyphōnía variety of tones. See poly-, -phony]
po•lyph′o•nous, adj.
po•lyph′o•nous•ly, adv.

polyphony, polyphonism

the combination of a number of separate but harmonizing melodies, as in a fugue. Cf. homophony. — polyphonic, polyphonous, adj.
See also: Music

polyphony

Music with independent melodies interwoven.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polyphony - music arranged in parts for several voices or instruments
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
counterpoint - a musical form involving the simultaneous sound of two or more melodies
monody, monophonic music, monophony - music consisting of a single vocal part (usually with accompaniment)
Translations

polyphony

[pəˈlɪfənɪ] Npolifonía f

polyphony

n (Mus) → Polyfonie f

polyphony

[pəˈlɪfənɪ] n (Mus) → polifonia
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ensemble Gilles Binchois's Les premieres polyphonies francaises: organa et tropes du XIieme siecle (Virgin-Veritas 7243 5 45135 2 7, rec 1994) includes reconstructions of several Masses, complete or in part (Christmas, the Common of Martyrs, Epiphany, Easter and Circumcision), and presents examples of the two means of embellishing music at this time--trope and organum.
And this is the point of departure for Eya mater: chant gregorien: polyphonies des XI-XII siecles (Opus 111 OPS 30-143, rec 1995).