polysemic


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Related to polysemic: polysemy
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polysemic

[ˌpɒlɪˈsiːmɪk] polysemous [pɒˈlɪsəməs] ADJpolisémico
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This polysemic notion is now widely used in art and social sciences literature and it contains elements like game, chaos, partiality, schizophrenia, polymorphism, dissolution, surface, collage, lack of identity, anarchy, intertextuality.
Typically, some of these other concepts are embodied in other meanings of the word jukurrpa itself, though the exact range of polysemic meanings may differ somewhat from language to language.
This highlights the polysemic, ambiguous, multivalent nature of art.
The conceptualisation of political economy, on the other hand, has assumed a polysemic nature.
In any case, Atkinson might have been minded to dispense with the concept of 'text entirely as a less tangible, less theoretically fraught term might be appropriate - as evinced in Text: The Genealogy qf an Anticlisciplinary Object (1992), in which John Mowitt effectively argues for a more multi-layered, polysemic approach to non-literary works such as film.
The utterance depicts an interesting polysemic speech unit, which may represent any question, depending on the situation and the conversation topic.
Kyto (1987) appreciates the polysemic approach towards the analysis of the modal verbs.
763) discusses the complexities of the polysemic term parivarta and its occurrence in Mahayana satra literature.
On the other hand, Morgan frequently ignores his own directive and seeks to ascertain the precise significance of a given shot, cut, or formal device, only to be invariably thwarted by the mercurially polysemic nature of Godard's work.
This term, notoriously vague and polysemic, renders the complexity of our experience of place, in which perception, emotion, and cultural meanings are deeply intertwined.
It may thus be observed in general terms that globalisation needs peace in order best to exploit communications structures (peace provides certainty and therefore predictability); but peace does not need worldwide globalisation, because in the polysemic plurality defined above, peace is more easily achieved and conserved at the micro/meso level of a single society.
There are six chapters: recovering the creole synthesis; the creole synthesis in the New World; Long Island and the Lower East Side; minstrelsy's material culture; melody's polyrhythmic polysemic possibilities; akimbo culture.