polysyllable


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pol·y·syl·la·ble

 (pŏl′ē-sĭl′ə-bəl)
n.
A word of more than two and usually more than three syllables.

polysyllable

(ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbəl)
n
(Linguistics) a word consisting of more than two syllables

pol•y•syl•la•ble

(ˈpɒl iˌsɪl ə bəl, ˌpɒl iˈsɪl-)

n.
a polysyllabic word.

polysyllable

A word that contains many syllables.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polysyllable - a word of more than three syllables
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
jawbreaker - a word that is hard to pronounce
sesquipedalia, sesquipedalian - a very long word (a foot and a half long)
Translations

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] Npolisílabo m

polysyllable

nPolysyllabum nt (spec), → vielsilbiges Wort

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] npolisillabo
References in classic literature ?
Spite is a little word; but it represents as strange a jumble of feelings, and compound of discords, as any polysyllable in the language.
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
In some of his works, especially 'The Rambler,' where, it has been jocosely suggested, he was exercising the polysyllables that he wished to put into his 'Dictionary,' he does employ a stilted Latinized vocabulary and a stilted style, with too much use of abstract phrases for concrete ones, too many long sentences, much inverted order, and over-elaborate balance.
The adverse destinies ordained that one evening Mr Wegg's labouring bark became beset by polysyllables, and embarrassed among a perfect archipelago of hard words.
The unusual polysyllable thus becomes pivotal in, and to, the poem's closing comparisons, in which these forgotten civilians figure as the 'un-', 'not' and 'nor' people, consigned to invisibility, 'Behind the grief cordons', confined now to plots largely unvisited.
When this poem was recited to me, the performer introduced Dickensian pauses before each displaced rhyme, the better to display the ill-fitting polysyllable, and so to allow the real syllable silently to snap into place:
In a poem that is so consistently Germanic and monosyllabic in its diction, (7) this polysyllable stands out in all its foreignness: an exotic bird with an exotic name.
Most writers are not averse to trusting their readers with an occasional polysyllable, A few days ago The Wall Street Journal slipped verisimilitude into a page 1 lead.
1) The possibility of disinspiritment of country is real (my word processor objects to the polysyllable with the angry, red underlining of Word Me 2000).