polysyllable

(redirected from polysyllables)
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pol·y·syl·la·ble

 (pŏl′ē-sĭl′ə-bəl)
n.
A word of more than two and usually more than three syllables.

polysyllable

(ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbəl)
n
(Linguistics) a word consisting of more than two syllables

pol•y•syl•la•ble

(ˈpɒl iˌsɪl ə bəl, ˌpɒl iˈsɪl-)

n.
a polysyllabic word.

polysyllable

A word that contains many syllables.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polysyllable - a word of more than three syllables
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
jawbreaker - a word that is hard to pronounce
sesquipedalia, sesquipedalian - a very long word (a foot and a half long)
Translations

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] Npolisílabo m

polysyllable

nPolysyllabum nt (spec), → vielsilbiges Wort

polysyllable

[ˈpɒlɪˌsɪləbl] npolisillabo
References in classic literature ?
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
In some of his works, especially 'The Rambler,' where, it has been jocosely suggested, he was exercising the polysyllables that he wished to put into his 'Dictionary,' he does employ a stilted Latinized vocabulary and a stilted style, with too much use of abstract phrases for concrete ones, too many long sentences, much inverted order, and over-elaborate balance.
The adverse destinies ordained that one evening Mr Wegg's labouring bark became beset by polysyllables, and embarrassed among a perfect archipelago of hard words.
Spite is a little word; but it represents as strange a jumble of feelings, and compound of discords, as any polysyllable in the language.
He makes his keywords do much more work than careful analysis of what he is saying should allow, with too many assertions and too little careful analysis of what his rapidly flowing polysyllables might mean; too many claims about grammar school education "decontextualizing" the historical particularity of unspecified examples; too frequent references to anonymous "scholars" who now all assume something.
The 88 pseudoabbreviations contained in the corpus are prosodically controlled: monosyllables for syllable weight; polysyllables for syllable type of initial syllable and syllabic extension (number of syllables).
The adagio rhythm is determined by a plain syntax in which enumerations and polysyllables naturally become salient and elicit a sense of "elongation" and almost "slow relaxation".
The proportion of polysyllables on position 10 in All's Well is 4.
1291, where SRPC refers to the square root of the number of polysyllables (words with three or more syllables).
The truism is said in very inflated rhetoric, polysyllables and so on.
Gulliver also goes to the "School of Languages", where he encounters projects that attempt to "shorten discourse by cutting Polysyllables into one [.
We are reminded of the School of Languages in Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726), working busily to "shorten Discourse by cutting Polysyllables into one, and leaving out Verbs and Participles; because in reality all things imaginable are but Nouns" (177).