polytheistic


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pol·y·the·ism

 (pŏl′ē-thē-ĭz′əm, pŏl′ē-thē′ĭz-əm)
n.
The worship of or belief in more than one god.

[French polythéisme, from Greek polutheos, polytheistic : polu-, poly- + theos, god; see dhēs- in Indo-European roots.]

pol′y·the′ist n.
pol′y·the·is′tic adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.polytheistic - worshipping or believing in more than one god
monotheistic - believing that there is only one god
Translations

polytheistic

[ˌpɒlɪθiːˈɪstɪk] ADJpoliteísta

polytheistic

polytheistic

[ˌpɒlɪθiːˈɪstɪk] adjpoliteistico/a
References in classic literature ?
deities of the polytheistic faith, such as devils and angels, are not
Fetishism is a key concept of modernity, he says, but acquired a negative connotation from Africa where Europeans applied it to incomprehensible religious practices such as the adoration of stone or wooden objects that stamped savage practices as polytheistic and pagan.
The strongest link between Manganilla's Moors and Native America arises in the characterization of Moorish religion as polytheistic.
MAP also revisits the relationship between religious thought and practice, and between polytheistic and monotheistic systems, questioning the relevance of these categories.
Praising the attack, the Islamic State (IS) noted that its "heroic Caliphate soldier tore down one of the most famous nightclubs where Christians celebrated their polytheistic feast.
The reasons for the fatwa against "PokAaAaAeA@mon" listed by the clerics includ the game's alleged promotion of natural evolution through its monster character's "evolved" stages, polytheistic themes, and Christian and Shinto religious iconography.
In addition to excluding those who are polytheistic or who just question why God would support one nation over any other, they exclude non-believers.
Freeman discusses god's existence in the polytheistic religions of Buddhism and Hinduism as well as in the monotheistic Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.
Polytheistic religions, which are close to nature, overlap naturally since it is the same elements that are essentially the subject of worship.
Frend have treated this topic by discussing only the role of emperors and governors in persecution of the Christians, leaving out an account of ordinary people in the polytheistic population.
He argues that Islam followed essentially the same trajectory as other transitions from paganism to monotheism, focusing especially on Rome's transition from a complex polytheistic system to an official monotheism in which Christianity served as the imperial faith of the empire and the emperor as its protector.
It's a fraught, heaving world, a polytheistic marketplace of arbitrary violence and idolatrous come-ons.