polyvalent

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pol·y·va·lent

 (pŏl′ē-vā′lənt)
adj.
1. Chemistry
a. Having more than one valence.
b. Having a valence of 3 or higher.
2. Immunology
a. Having more than one site of attachment. Used of an antibody or antigen.
b. Containing antigens from more than one strain of a microorganism or virus. Used of a vaccine or serum.

pol′y·va′lence, pol′y·va′len·cy n.

polyvalent

(ˌpɒlɪˈveɪlənt; pəˈlɪvələnt)
adj
1. (Chemistry) chem having more than one valency
2. (Medicine) (of a vaccine)
a. effective against several strains of the same disease-producing microorganism, antigen, or toxin
b. produced from cultures containing several strains of the same microorganism
ˌpolyˈvalency n

pol•y•va•lent

(ˌpɒl iˈveɪ lənt, pəˈlɪv ə lənt)

adj.
1. Chem. having more than one valence.
2. (of an immune serum) containing several antibodies, each capable of reacting with a specific antigen.
[1880–85]
pol`y•va′lence, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.polyvalent - containing several antibodies each capable of counteracting a specific antigen; "a polyvalent vaccine"
immunology - the branch of medical science that studies the body's immune system
monovalent - containing only one kind of antibody
2.polyvalent - having more than one valence, or having a valence of 3 or higher
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
monovalent, univalent - having a valence of 1
Translations

polyvalent

[pəˈlɪvələnt] ADJpolivalente

polyvalent

adjmehrwertig, polyvalent

pol·y·va·lent

a. polivalente, que tiene efecto en contra de más de un agente.

polyvalent

adj polivalente
References in periodicals archive ?
Other texts are preemptively interpreted, or moved, with all their polyvalences and hermeneutic possibilities, outside the plot, so that what happens to people "in stories" is distinct from, even if it bears an ironic or illuminating resemblance to, what happens to people in the "real world" Munro defines.
as it is being isolated and forced to bear not only the polyvalent meanings words have but a grammatical polyvalence which keeps tension