pomander

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po·man·der

 (pō′măn′dər, pō-măn′-)
n.
1. A small scented object, especially:
a. An orange or other fruit studded with spices such as cloves, used to freshen the air in a closet or dresser drawer.
b. A ball-shaped arrangement of flowers hung from a ribbon and carried, as at a wedding.
c. A mixture of aromatic substances enclosed in a bag or box, formerly worn on one's person as a protection against odor or infection.
2. A case, box, or bag for wearing a mixture of aromatic substances on one's person.

[Middle English pomendambre, alteration of Old French pome d'embre, apple of amber, from Medieval Latin pōmum dē ambrā : pōmum, apple, ball (from Latin, fruit) + Latin , of; see de- + ambrā, ablative of ambra, amber; see amber.]

pomander

(pəʊˈmændə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a mixture of aromatic substances in a sachet or an orange, formerly carried as scent or as a protection against disease
2. (Historical Terms) a container for such a mixture
[C15: from Old French pome d'ambre, from Medieval Latin pōmum ambrae apple of amber]

po•man•der

(ˈpoʊ mæn dər, poʊˈmæn dər)

n.
1. a mixture of aromatic substances, often in the form of a ball, formerly carried on the person as a supposed guard against infection but now placed for fragrance in closets, dressers, etc.
2. the bag or case in which this was formerly carried.
3. an orange or apple stuck with cloves, used to impart fragrance to closets, dressers, etc.
[1425–75; earlier pomaundre, pomemandre, late Middle English pomendambre < Middle French pome d'ambre < Medieval Latin pōmum ambrē literally, apple of amber. See pome, amber]
Translations

pomander

nDuftkugel f
References in classic literature ?
The Renaissance knew of strange manners of poisoning-- poisoning by a helmet and a lighted torch, by an embroidered glove and a jewelled fan, by a gilded pomander and by an amber chain.
Take in the smell of pomanders as you learn all about how families decorated their homes.
Floral-print glass jewellery box, PS12; silver bird object, PS6; frosted purple glass vase, PS12; faceted glass votive, PS2; dark orchid pack of three pomanders, PS5; faceted glass with nickle edge lantern tall, PS15; dark orchid large pillar candle, PS8; lavender and geranium diffuser, PS10; floral-print frame 5x7, PS8; dark orchid candle, PS8; dark orchid trinket jar candle large, PS4; square mercury glass bottle small, PS6; floral- print cushion 50x50, PS15; purple floral embroidered cushion 50x50, PS15; round button cushions, PS8 each; watercolour effect floral pillar candle, PS4; square mercury glass bottle large, PS10.
The Tudors dusted their hair with sweet-smelling powder to disguise body odour and to drive out lice, while during the great plague of 1664-65, pomanders filled with aromatic herbs and creams were carried to ward off germs.
They carried pomanders of ivory spray roses accented with satin and crystals.
Sainsbury's Pink Heart Button Cushion, PS10, is a pretty choice, as are the Primrose and Peony Heart Pomanders, PS6 for set of three (in stores only), and both are supporting Breakthrough Breast Cancer ( 0800 636 262/ www.
You can also keep active little minds and fingers busy by getting them to help you make Yuletide pomanders - oranges covered in cloves.
25 /PRNewswire/ -- For florists who want a faster, easier and better way to make today's trendy pomanders, kissing balls or flower girl arrangements, OASIS(R) Floral Products has the answer.
If you want some scented decorations at Christmas, push cloves into oranges to make aromatic pomanders to place in bowls or hang from the tree.
Stubbes warned that "palpable oders, fumes, vapours, smells of these musks, cyvets, pomanders, perfumes, balmes, and suche like .
10am-noon & 1pm-3pm, Priory Visitor Centre, Smelly Soap, Pungent Pomanders and Tasty Tudor Treats - Become a Tudor apprentice and make scented soap and sweets.