pomegranate


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Related to pomegranate: pomegranate tree

pom·e·gran·ate

 (pŏm′ĭ-grăn′ĭt, pŏm′grăn′ĭt, pŭm′ĭ-, pŭm′-)
n.
1. A deciduous shrub or small tree (Punica granatum) native to Asia and widely cultivated for its edible fruit.
2. The fruit of this tree, having a tough reddish rind and containing numerous seeds surrounded by tart juicy red pulp.

[Middle English pome granate, from Old French pome grenate : pome, apple; see pome + grenate, having many seeds (from Latin grānātus, from grānum, grain, seed; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots).]

pomegranate

(ˈpɒmɪˌɡrænɪt; ˈpɒmˌɡrænɪt)
n
1. (Plants) an Asian shrub or small tree, Punica granatum, cultivated in semitropical regions for its edible fruit: family Punicaceae
2. (Plants) the many-chambered globular fruit of this tree, which has tough reddish rind, juicy red pulp, and many seeds
[C14: from Old French pome grenate, from Latin pōmum apple + grenate, from Latin grānātum, from grānātus full of seeds]

pome•gran•ate

(ˈpɒmˌgræn ɪt, ˈpɒm ɪ-, ˈpʌm-)

n.
1. a round fruit with a leathery red rind, containing membranous chambers filled with a juicy, tart red pulp and white seeds.
2. the small tree, Punica granatum, of the family Punicaceae, that bears this fruit.
[1275–1325; Middle English poumgarnet, pomegarnade (< Old French pome grenate, pome gernete), representing Medieval Latin pōmum grānātum literally, seedy apple. See pome, grenade]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pomegranate - shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruitpomegranate - shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruit
pomegranate - large globular fruit having many seeds with juicy red pulp in a tough brownish-red rind
genus Punica, Punica - coextensive with the family Punicaceae
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.pomegranate - large globular fruit having many seeds with juicy red pulp in a tough brownish-red rind
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
pomegranate, pomegranate tree, Punica granatum - shrub or small tree native to southwestern Asia having large red many-seeded fruit
Translations
رُمَّانشَجَرَة الرُمّان
granátové jablko
granatæble
GranatapfelGrenadine
granato
انار
granaattiomena
nar
gránátalma
granatepli
ザクロ
석류
granatas
granātābols
rodierodiu
granátové jablko
granatäpple
ผลทับทิม
انار
lựu

pomegranate

[ˈpɒməgrænɪt] N (= fruit) → granada f; (= tree) → granado m

pomegranate

[ˈpɒmɪgrænət] ngrenade f (fruit)

pomegranate

nGranatapfel m; (= tree)Granatapfelbaum m, → Granatbaum m

pomegranate

[ˈpɒmɪˌgrænɪt] n (tree) → melograno; (fruit) → melagrana

pomegranate

(ˈpomigrӕnət) noun
a type of fruit with a thick skin and many seeds.

pomegranate

رُمَّان granátové jablko granatæble Granatapfel ρόδι granada granaattiomena grenade nar melagrana ザクロ 석류 granaatappel granateple granat romã гранат granatäpple ผลทับทิม nar lựu 石榴
References in classic literature ?
Huge pomegranate trees, with their glossy leaves and flame-colored flowers, dark-leaved Arabian jessamines, with their silvery stars, geraniums, luxuriant roses bending beneath their heavy abundance of flowers, golden jessamines, lemon-scented verbenum, all united their bloom and fragrance, while here and there a mystic old aloe, with its strange, massive leaves, sat looking like some old enchanter, sitting in weird grandeur among the more perishable bloom and fragrance around it.
At its heels was a wolf, who had almost seized it, when the cat changed itself into a worm, and, piercing the skin of a pomegranate which had tumbled from a tree, hid itself in the fruit.
Here again she received a present with the same injunctions, but instead of a nut this lady gave her a golden pomegranate.
She did not invoke God, we very well know, but she had faith in the genius of evil--that immense sovereignty which reigns in all the details of human life, and by which, as in the Arabian fable, a single pomegranate seed is sufficient to reconstruct a ruined world.
The color mounted to the queen's face; her fine blue eyes seemed to start out of her head and her carmine lips, compared by all the poets of the day to a pomegranate in flower, were trembling with anger.
Nevertheless, since there was no better to be had, he brought this dry, old withered pomegranate home to the palace.
There flourish the olive, the fig, the date, the orange, the citron, the pomegranate, and other fruits belonging to the voluptuous climates of the south; with grapes in abundance, that yield a generous wine.
It had a shell harder even than iron; within which were arranged, like the seeds of a pomegranate, jewels of various colors; some transparent as crystals; others of a fine red, and others of mixed hues.
Sinbad went on in this manner with his narrative to the caliph- 'I thanked the man-animal for its kindness, and soon found myself very much at home on the beast, which swam at a prodigious rate through the ocean; although the surface of the latter is, in that part of the world, by no means flat, but round like a pomegranate, so that we went -- so to say -- either up hill or down hill all the time.
After these two noble fruits of friendship (peace in the affections, and support of the judgment), followeth the last fruit; which is like the pomegranate, full of many kernels; I mean aid, and bearing a part, in all actions and occasions.
with pomegranate, fig, olive and quince orchards, and nooned an hour
His hair is brown and crisp, and his lips are red as a pomegranate, and he has large and dreamy eyes.