pomp


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Related to pomp: Pomp and Circumstance

pomp

 (pŏmp)
n.
1. Dignified or magnificent display; splendor: the solemn pomp of a military funeral.
2. Vain or ostentatious display: "his biting attacks on the pomp and luxury of the privileged classes" (Harvey Cox).

[Middle English, from Old French pompe, from Latin pompa, pomp, procession, from Greek pompē, procession, from pempein, to send.]

pomp

(pɒmp)
n
1. stately or magnificent display; ceremonial splendour
2. vain display, esp of dignity or importance
3. obsolete a procession or pageant
[C14: from Old French pompe, from Latin pompa procession, from Greek pompē; related to Greek pompein to send]

pomp

(pɒmp)

n.
1. stately or splendid display; splendor; magnificence.
2. ostentatious or vain display, esp. of dignity or importance.
3. pomps, pompous displays, actions, or things.
4. Archaic. a stately procession; pageant.
[1275–1325; < Latin pompa display, parade, procession < Greek pompḗ orig., a sending, akin to pémpein to send]

Pomp

 a procession or pageant; a splendid display.
Examples: pomp of clothing, 1483; of flowers, 1750; of godliness, 1709; of winning graces, 1667; of mourning, 1651; of Pekingese—Hare, 1939; of powers, 1750; of riches, 1535; of terror, 1633; of waters, 1595.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pomp - cheap or pretentious or vain display
display, show - something intended to communicate a particular impression; "made a display of strength"; "a show of impatience"; "a good show of looking interested"
2.pomp - ceremonial elegance and splendor; "entered with much eclat in a coach drawn by eight white horses"
elegance - a refined quality of gracefulness and good taste; "she conveys an aura of elegance and gentility"

pomp

noun
1. ceremony, grandeur, splendour, state, show, display, parade, flourish, pageant, magnificence, solemnity, pageantry, ostentation, éclat the pomp and splendour of the English aristocracy
2. show, pomposity, grandiosity, vainglory The band have trawled new depths of pomp and self-indulgence.

pomp

noun
An impressive or ostentatious exhibition:
Translations
أُبَّهَه
pompa
pomp og pragt
viîhöfn
pompapompastikapompastiškai
greznībapompa

pomp

[pɒmp] Npompa f
pomp and circumstancepompa f y solemnidad

pomp

[ˈpɒmp] nfaste f

pomp

nPomp m, → Prunk m, → Gepränge nt; pomp and circumstancePomp und Prunk m

pomp

[pɒmp] npompa, fasto
pomp and circumstance → grande or magnifico apparato

pomp

(pomp) noun
solemn stateliness and magnificence, eg at a ceremonial occasion. The Queen arrived with great pomp and ceremony.
ˈpompous adjective
too grand in manner or speech. The headmaster is inclined to be a bit pompous.
ˈpompously adverb
ˈpompousness noun
pomˈposity (-ˈpo-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Rich reliquary Of lofty contemplation left to Time By buried centuries of pomp and power
My Father seduced by the false glare of Fortune and the Deluding Pomp of Title, insisted on my giving my hand to Lady Dorothea.
The following by certain estates of men, answerable to that, which a great person himself professeth (as of soldiers, to him that hath been employed in the wars, and the like), hath ever been a thing civil, and well taken, even in monarchies; so it be without too much pomp or popularity.
We wonder at the grandeur, the riches, the pomp, the ceremonies, the government, the manufactures, the commerce, and conduct of these people; not that there is really any matter for wonder, but because, having a true notion of the barbarity of those countries, the rudeness and the ignorance that prevail there, we do not expect to find any such thing so far off.
The third cook, crowned with a resplendent tin basin and wrapped royally in a table-cloth mottled with grease-spots and coffee stains, and bearing a sceptre that looked strangely like a belaying-pin, walked upon a dilapidated carpet and perched himself on the capstan, careless of the flying spray; his tarred and weather-beaten Chamberlains, Dukes and Lord High Admirals surrounded him, arrayed in all the pomp that spare tarpaulins and remnants of old sails could furnish.
Belleforet, Father Le Juge, and Corrozet affirm that it was picked up on the morrow, with great pomp, by the clergy of the quarter, and borne to the treasury of the church of Saint Opportune, where the sacristan, even as late as 1789, earned a tolerably handsome revenue out of the great miracle of the Statue of the Virgin at the corner of the Rue Mauconseil, which had, by its mere presence, on the memorable night between the sixth and seventh of January, 1482, exorcised the defunct Eustache Moubon, who, in order to play a trick on the devil, had at his death maliciously concealed his soul in his straw pallet.
Several present, such as the Candy Man, the Rubber Bear, Tik-tok, and the Scarecrow, were not made so they could eat, and the Queen of Merryland contented herself with a small dish of sawdust; but these enjoyed the pomp and glitter of the gorgeous scene as much as did those who feasted.
It was now the middle of May, and the morning was remarkably serene, when Mr Allworthy walked forth on the terrace, where the dawn opened every minute that lovely prospect we have before described to his eye; and now having sent forth streams of light, which ascended the blue firmament before him, as harbingers preceding his pomp, in the full blaze of his majesty rose the sun, than which one object alone in this lower creation could be more glorious, and that Mr Allworthy himself presented--a human being replete with benevolence, meditating in what manner he might render himself most acceptable to his Creator, by doing most good to his creatures.
Here have I been persuading Herr Liesecke to stop for POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE, and you are undoing all my work.
It was an hour after sunup that I heard the boys coming, and recognized the hoof-beats of Pomp and Caesar and Jerry, old mates of mine; and a welcomer sound there couldn't ever be.
It might have seemed to him a waste of pomp and ammunition to kill a bug with a battery of artillery, but there seemed nothing incon- gruous about the getting up such an expensive thunder- storm as this to knock the turf from under an insect like himself.
And because my first inclination was to be entertained with scenes of pomp and magnificence, I desired to see Alexander the Great at the head of his army, just after the battle of Arbela: which, upon a motion of the governor's finger, immediately appeared in a large field, under the window where we stood.