rococo

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Related to pompadour style: Pompadour haircut

ro·co·co

 (rə-kō′kō, rō′kə-kō′)
n. also Rococo
1.
a. A style of art, especially architecture and decorative art, that originated in France in the early 1700s and is marked by elaborate ornamentation, as with a profusion of scrolls, foliage, and animal forms.
b. A very ornate style of speech or writing.
2. Music A style of composition arising in the 1700s in France, often viewed as an extension of the baroque, and characterized by a high degree of ornamentation and lightness of expression.
adj.
1. also Rococo Of or relating to the rococo.
2. Immoderately elaborate or complicated.

[French, probably alteration of rocaille, rockwork, from roc, rock, variant of roche, from Vulgar Latin *rocca.]

rococo

(rəˈkəʊkəʊ)
n (often capital)
1. (Architecture) a style of architecture and decoration that originated in France in the early 18th century, characterized by elaborate but graceful, light, ornamentation, often containing asymmetrical motifs
2. (Classical Music) an 18th-century style of music characterized by petite prettiness, a decline in the use of counterpoint, and extreme use of ornamentation
3. any florid or excessively ornamental style
adj
4. (Classical Music) denoting, being in, or relating to the rococo
5. (Architecture) denoting, being in, or relating to the rococo
6. florid or excessively elaborate
[C19: from French, from rocaille, from roc rock1]

ro•co•co

(rəˈkoʊ koʊ, ˌroʊ kəˈkoʊ)

n.
1. an artistic style, chiefly of 18th-century France, marked by elegance and delicate ornamentation.
2. a homophonic 18th-century musical style marked by a witty fluency.
adj.
3. pertaining to or characteristic of rococo.
4. ornate or florid in speech, literary style, etc.
[1830–40; < French, akin to rocaille rocaille]

rococo

Often Derogatory. an artistic and literary style, developed from the baroque, characterized by complex and elaborate ornamentation. — rococo, adj.
See also: Art

rococo


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1. A light and harmonic style of music that came to prominence in the early and mid eighteenth century in Europe, chiefly in France and Germany, following the baroque period. It is similar to baroque music in being characterized by ornamentation, but it is distinguished from baroque especially in featuring reduced use of counterpoint and less formality and complexity.
2. A style of French asymmetrical furniture, originating in the eighteenth century, emphasizing the S-shaped curve and comfort in reaction to baroque formality. It was characterized by improved plush upholstery, chinoiserie, bright colors, swirling carving, and extravagant marquetry. The style was widely exported and represents the zenith of restless frivolity of Louis XV furniture.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rococo - fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and architecture that originated in France in the 18th centuryrococo - fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and architecture that originated in France in the 18th century
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
Adj.1.rococo - having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation; "an exquisite gilded rococo mirror"
fancy - not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"

rococo

adjective extravagant, fancy, elegant, elaborate, baroque, ornamented, ornate, fussy, convoluted, flowery, florid, overelaborate, high-wrought, highly decorated, aureate rococo trimmings and gilt cherubs

rococo

adjective
Elaborately and heavily ornamented:
Translations
rokoko
rokokó

rococo

[rəʊˈkəʊkəʊ]
A. ADJrococó
B. Nrococó m

rococo

[rəˈkəʊkəʊ]
nrococo m
adj [style, art, artist, theatre] → rococo inv

rococo

nRokoko nt
adjRokoko-; rococo periodRokoko nt, → Rokokozeit f

rococo

[rəʊˈkəʊkəʊ] adj & nrococò (m) inv
References in classic literature ?
Diana did Anne's front hair in the new pompadour style and Anne tied Diana's bows with the especial knack she possessed; and they experimented with at least half a dozen different ways of arranging their back hair.
Oh, yes," returned the young man, smiling; "on the contrary, I have one, but I expected the count would be tempted by one of the brilliant proposals made him, yet as he has not replied to any of them, I will venture to offer him a suite of apartments in a charming hotel, in the Pompadour style, that my sister has inhabited for a year, in the Rue Meslay.
Bumped into Auburn resident and chicken owner Ken Ethier, who looked on with amusement at three snow white chickens whose feathers had been done up in a pompadour style that the late, some would say great, Porter Wagoner would have loved.