pompion


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pompion

(ˈpɒmpɪən)
n
1. (Plants) a pumpkin
2. (Plants) a pomelo
adj
(of language) overblown
References in periodicals archive ?
Recipes include Metheglin (Cornish Ginger Mead), Stewed Pompion (Spicy Pumpkin Soup), Iumbolls (a.
In middle French, this became pompon, and in English pompion, then pumpion, and eventually pumpkin or punkin.
The term pompion was applied to the Indian pepo squashes beginning in the early 16th century.
They are named from the French term pompion, which means they are eaten when "cooked by the sun" (or ripe).
The French pronounced it as pompon, the English changed this to pompion (the word is used by Shakespeare in his Merry Wives of Windsor) and the American colonists converted this to pumpkin.
Early writers such as Thomas Harlot and Charles de L'Ecluse described these as Virginia macocqwer or macocks, and John Gerard (1636) as a kind of pompion (pumpkin) but smaller, with a blackish green color when ripe.
In March and April, we set Potatoes, Pompions, Cucumbers, Melons, Kidney-beans, etc.