pompous


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pom·pous

 (pŏm′pəs)
adj.
1. Characterized by excessive self-esteem or exaggerated dignity; pretentious: pompous officials who enjoy giving orders.
2. Full of high-sounding phrases; bombastic: a pompous proclamation.
3. Archaic Characterized by pomp or stately display: a pompous occasion.

[Middle English, from Old French pompeux, from Late Latin pompōsus, from Latin pompa, pomp; see pomp.]

pom·pos′i·ty (-pŏs′ĭ-tē), pom′pous·ness (-pəs-nĭs) n.
pom′pous·ly adv.

pompous

(ˈpɒmpəs)
adj
1. exaggeratedly or ostentatiously dignified or self-important
2. ostentatiously lofty in style: a pompous speech.
3. rare characterized by ceremonial pomp or splendour
ˈpompously adv
ˈpompousness n

pomp•ous

(ˈpɒm pəs)

adj.
1. characterized by an ostentatious display of dignity or importance.
2. ostentatiously lofty or high-flown: a pompous speech.
3. characterized by pomp or stately splendor.
[1325–75; Middle English < Late Latin pompōsus]
pomp′ous•ly, adv.
syn: See grandiose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pompous - puffed up with vanity; "a grandiloquent and boastful manner"; "overblown oratory"; "a pompous speech"; "pseudo-scientific gobbledygook and pontifical hooey"- Newsweek
pretentious - making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"
2.pompous - characterized by pomp and ceremony and stately display

pompous

pompous

adjective
Characterized by an exaggerated show of dignity or self-importance:
Informal: highfalutin.
Translations
أبَّهي، دالٌّ على أبَّهَه
pompézní
bombastiskopblæst
nagyképű
merkilegur meî sig
görkemlikurumlu

pompous

[ˈpɒmpəs] ADJ [person] → pretencioso; [occasion] → ostentoso; [language] → ampuloso, inflado

pompous

[ˈpɒmpəs] adj [person, style, comment] → pompeux/euse

pompous

adj
personaufgeblasen, wichtigtuerisch; attitude, behaviour also, phrasegespreizt; language, letter, remarkschwülstig, bombastisch; don’t be so pompoustu nicht so aufgeblasen, sei nicht so wichtigtuerisch
(= magnificent) buildinggrandios, bombastisch; occasiongrandios

pompous

[ˈpɒmpəs] adj (pej) (speech, attitude) → pomposo/a; (person) → pieno/a di boria

pomp

(pomp) noun
solemn stateliness and magnificence, eg at a ceremonial occasion. The Queen arrived with great pomp and ceremony.
ˈpompous adjective
too grand in manner or speech. The headmaster is inclined to be a bit pompous.
ˈpompously adverb
ˈpompousness noun
pomˈposity (-ˈpo-) noun
References in classic literature ?
He is a harsh man; at once pompous and meddling; he cut off our hair; and for economy's sake bought us bad needles and thread, with which we could hardly sew.
Here pompous official representatives may demur; but who can doubt that it is on its literature that a country must rely for its permanent representation?
Agatha, on the other hand, having from her childhood heard Uncle John quoted as wisdom and authority incarnate, had begun in her tender years to scoff at him as a pompous and purseproud city merchant, whose sordid mind was unable to cope with her transcendental affairs.
He escorted them to their box with a sort of pompous humility, waving his fat jewelled hands and talking at the top of his voice.
The central box contained the lean but pompous Sheriff, his bejeweled wife, and their daughter, a supercilious young woman enough, who, it was openly hinted, was hoping to receive the golden arrow from the victor and thus be crowned queen of the day.
Aramis, confiding in the address of Bazin, made a pompous eulogium on his candidate.
Having delivered himself of this pompous address, uttered with a degree of energy that left the baron almost out of breath, he bowed to the assembled party and withdrew to his drawing-room, whose sumptuous furnishings of white and gold had caused a great sensation in the Chaussee d'Antin.
But, after all, it was the most singular part of the affair that so many of the pompous governors of Massachusetts had allowed the obliterated picture to remain in the state chamber of the Province House.
Sometimes, no doubt, it followed in the train of the pompous governors when they came over from England.
Well over fifty years of age when I knew him, short, stout, dignified, perhaps a little pompous, he was a man of a singularly well-informed mind, the least sailor-like in outward aspect, but certainly one of the best seamen whom it has been my good luck to serve under.
Rushworth, a well-meaning, civil, prosing, pompous woman, who thought nothing of consequence, but as it related to her own and her son's concerns, had not yet given over pressing Lady Bertram to be of the party.
In pompous language, however, which jumbled one sentence into another, and at length grew disconnected, he gave me to understand that I was to lead the children altogether away from the Casino, and out into the park.