pompous


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pom·pous

 (pŏm′pəs)
adj.
1. Characterized by excessive self-esteem or exaggerated dignity; pretentious: pompous officials who enjoy giving orders.
2. Full of high-sounding phrases; bombastic: a pompous proclamation.
3. Archaic Characterized by pomp or stately display: a pompous occasion.

[Middle English, from Old French pompeux, from Late Latin pompōsus, from Latin pompa, pomp; see pomp.]

pom·pos′i·ty (-pŏs′ĭ-tē), pom′pous·ness (-pəs-nĭs) n.
pom′pous·ly adv.

pompous

(ˈpɒmpəs)
adj
1. exaggeratedly or ostentatiously dignified or self-important
2. ostentatiously lofty in style: a pompous speech.
3. rare characterized by ceremonial pomp or splendour
ˈpompously adv
ˈpompousness n

pomp•ous

(ˈpɒm pəs)

adj.
1. characterized by an ostentatious display of dignity or importance.
2. ostentatiously lofty or high-flown: a pompous speech.
3. characterized by pomp or stately splendor.
[1325–75; Middle English < Late Latin pompōsus]
pomp′ous•ly, adv.
syn: See grandiose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pompous - puffed up with vanity; "a grandiloquent and boastful manner"; "overblown oratory"; "a pompous speech"; "pseudo-scientific gobbledygook and pontifical hooey"- Newsweek
pretentious - making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"
2.pompous - characterized by pomp and ceremony and stately display

pompous

pompous

adjective
Characterized by an exaggerated show of dignity or self-importance:
Informal: highfalutin.
Translations
أبَّهي، دالٌّ على أبَّهَه
pompézní
bombastiskopblæst
nagyképű
merkilegur meî sig
görkemlikurumlu

pompous

[ˈpɒmpəs] ADJ [person] → pretencioso; [occasion] → ostentoso; [language] → ampuloso, inflado

pompous

[ˈpɒmpəs] adj [person, style, comment] → pompeux/euse

pompous

adj
personaufgeblasen, wichtigtuerisch; attitude, behaviour also, phrasegespreizt; language, letter, remarkschwülstig, bombastisch; don’t be so pompoustu nicht so aufgeblasen, sei nicht so wichtigtuerisch
(= magnificent) buildinggrandios, bombastisch; occasiongrandios

pompous

[ˈpɒmpəs] adj (pej) (speech, attitude) → pomposo/a; (person) → pieno/a di boria

pomp

(pomp) noun
solemn stateliness and magnificence, eg at a ceremonial occasion. The Queen arrived with great pomp and ceremony.
ˈpompous adjective
too grand in manner or speech. The headmaster is inclined to be a bit pompous.
ˈpompously adverb
ˈpompousness noun
pomˈposity (-ˈpo-) noun
References in classic literature ?
He read it aloud in a pompous voice, as if to let Dorothy and Billina see that he was educated and could read writing.
Erstwhile worth-while fun and stunts seemed no longer worth while; and it was a torment to listen to the insipidities and stupidities of women, to the pompous, arrogant sayings of the little half-baked men.
Now, Miss Amelia Sedley was a young lady of this singular species; and deserved not only all that Miss Pinkerton said in her praise, but had many charming qualities which that pompous old Minerva of a woman could not see, from the differences of rank and age between her pupil and herself.
Well over fifty years of age when I knew him, short, stout, dignified, perhaps a little pompous, he was a man of a singularly well-informed mind, the least sailor-like in outward aspect, but certainly one of the best seamen whom it has been my good luck to serve under.
Well, I daresay you'll do," he said at last, in a pompous way.
Sometimes, no doubt, it followed in the train of the pompous governors when they came over from England.
He was pompous, but he did at least understand what was said to him.
Here pompous official representatives may demur; but who can doubt that it is on its literature that a country must rely for its permanent representation?
d'Artagnan had foreseen, began to prefer the good cause to the bad one, and the parliament, rumpish as it was, to the pompous nothings of Lambert's designs.
The Prime Minister out of office is seen, too often, to have been but a pompous rhetorician, and the General without an army is but the tame hero of a market town.
His tone was pompous and he strutted up and down in an absurd attempt to appear dignified.
Scattered here and there, more massive blocks showed where some pompous tomb or ambitious monument had once flung its feeble defiance at oblivion.