pony

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po·ny

 (pō′nē)
n. pl. po·nies
1. A horse of any of several stocky breeds that are small in size when full grown, such as the Shetland pony.
2.
a. Informal A racehorse.
b. Sports A polo horse.
3. Something small for its kind, especially a small glass for beer or liqueur.
4. A word-for-word translation of a foreign language text, especially one used as an aid in studying or test-taking. Also called crib, trot.
5. Chiefly British The sum of 25 pounds.
tr.v. po·nied, po·ny·ing, po·nies
To lead (a horse) with another horse.
Phrasal Verb:
pony up Slang
To pay (money owed or due).

[Probably from obsolete French poulenet, diminutive of poulain, colt, from Late Latin pullāmen, young of an animal, from Latin pullus; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

pony

(ˈpəʊnɪ)
n, pl ponies
1. (Animals) any of various breeds of small horse, usually under 14.2 hands
2.
a. a small drinking glass, esp for liqueurs
b. the amount held by such a glass
3. anything small of its kind
4. (Gambling, except Cards) slang Brit a sum of £25, esp in bookmaking
5. (Education) slang Also called: trot US a literal translation used by students, often illicitly, in preparation for foreign language lessons or examinations; crib
[C17: from Scottish powney, perhaps from obsolete French poulenet a little colt, from poulain colt, from Latin pullus young animal, foal]

po•ny

(ˈpoʊ ni)

n., pl. -nies, n.
1. a small horse of any of several breeds, usu. not higher at the shoulder than 14½ hands (58 in./146 cm).
2. Slang. a racehorse.
3. Informal. a literal translation or summary of a text, used illicitly as an aid in schoolwork; crib.
4. something small of its kind.
5. a small glass holding about one ounce (30 ml) of liqueur.
6. a small beverage bottle, often holding seven ounces (196 g).
v.
7. pony up, Informal. to pay (money), as to settle an account.
[1650–60; < French (now obsolete) poulenet, diminutive of poulain colt < Medieval Latin pullānus (Latin pull(us) foal + -ānus -an1); see -et]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pony - a range horse of the western United Statespony - a range horse of the western United States
Equus caballus, horse - solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
mustang - small hardy range horse of the western plains descended from horses brought by the Spanish
cayuse, Indian pony - a small native range horse
2.pony - an informal term for a racehorse; "he liked to bet on the ponies"
bangtail, race horse, racehorse - a horse bred for racing
3.pony - a literal translation used in studying a foreign language (often used illicitly)
interlingual rendition, translation, version, rendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
4.pony - a small glass adequate to hold a single swallow of whiskeypony - a small glass adequate to hold a single swallow of whiskey
drinking glass, glass - a container for holding liquids while drinking
5.pony - any of various breeds of small gentle horses usually less than five feet high at the shoulder
Equus caballus, horse - solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
Shetland pony - breed of very small pony with long shaggy mane and tail
Welsh pony - breed of small ponies originally from Wales
Exmoor - stocky breed of pony with a fawn-colored nose

pony

noun
Related words
collective noun herd
Translations
فَرَسٌ قَزَممُهْر،حِصان صَغير
poník
pony
poni
poni
póni
smáhestur
ポニー
조랑말
arklio uodegapasijodinėjimasponis
ponijs
poni
ponny
ม้าพันธุ์เล็ก
ngựa nhỏ

pony

[ˈpəʊnɪ]
A. N
1.poney m, potro m
2. (Brit) → 25 libras
3. (US) (Scol) → chuleta f
B. CPD pony trekking Nexcursión f en poney

pony

[ˈpəʊni] nponey m pony clubpony club n club équestre où l'on monte à poney

pony

n
Pony nt
(Brit sl) → 25 Pfund
(US sl: = crib) → Spickzettel m
(US inf: = small glass) → Gläschen nt

pony

:
pony express
nPonyexpress m
ponytail
nPferdeschwanz m; she was wearing her hair in a ponysie trug einen Pferdeschwanz
pony trekking
nPonyreiten nt; a pony holidayein Ponyreiturlaub m

pony

[ˈpəʊnɪ] npony m inv

pony

(ˈpəuni) plural ˈponies noun
a small horse. The child was riding a brown pony.
ˈpony-tail noun
(a kind of hairstyle with the) hair tied in a bunch at the back of the head.
ˈpony-trekking noun
the sport or pastime of riding in the countryside in small groups.

pony

فَرَسٌ قَزَم poník pony Pony πόνι poni poni poney poni pony ポニー 조랑말 pony ponni kucyk pónei, pônei пони ponny ม้าพันธุ์เล็ก midilli ngựa nhỏ 小马驹
References in classic literature ?
We see under the feet of our ponies a mixture of moorland and bog--here, the strip of firm ground that we are standing on, and there, a few feet off, the strip of watery peat-bog, which is deep enough to suffocate us if we step into it.
Our guide, in front of us, answers that it will end in the ponies finding their way certainly to the nearest village or the nearest house.
Our ponies composedly help themselves to such grass as they can find on the moor; keeping always near us as companionably as if they were a couple of dogs.
The ponies caper and kick, in unrestrained enjoyment of their freedom; and sometimes follow, sometimes precede us, as the humor of the moment inclines them.
I am laid down in the bottom of the boat, with my saddle-pillow; and we shove off, leaving the ponies to the desolate freedom of the moor.
What he saw sent him to the ground, huddled close beneath the shrubbery--a man was coming, leading two ponies.
The ponies stood for an instant transfixed with terror.
SHETLAND ponies could soon be paying a visit to retirement homes, day centres and people with physical and mental disabilities after a couple trained them to provide therapy.
Featured are stories of the training of pit ponies and the lads who worked with them; the ponies at shows and races; the dangers that men and the ponies faced; and finally the day when horse power came to an end when the last pit pony left Ellington Colliery in 1994.
THE fascinating world of the coal industry's pit ponies and horses is being explored at the National Coal Mining Museum for England.