poon

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poon

 (po͞on)
n.
Any of several trees of the genus Calophyllum, of southern Asia, having light hard wood formerly used for masts and spars.

[Sinhalese pūna, perhaps of Dravidian origin.]

poon

(puːn)
n
1. (Plants) any of several trees of the SE Asian genus Calophyllum having lightweight hard wood and shiny leathery leaves: family Clusiaceae
2. (Forestry) the wood of any of these trees, used to make masts and spars
[C17: from Sinhalese pūna]

poon

(puːn)
n
slang Austral a stupid or ineffectual person
[C20: from English dialect]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poon - wood of any poon tree; used for masts and spars
poon - any of several East Indian trees of the genus Calophyllum having shiny leathery leaves and lightweight hard wood
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.poon - any of several East Indian trees of the genus Calophyllum having shiny leathery leaves and lightweight hard wood
Calophyllum, genus Calophyllum - genus of tropical evergreen trees
poon - wood of any poon tree; used for masts and spars
Alexandrian laurel, Calophyllum inophyllum - East Indian tree having racemes of fragrant white flowers; coastal areas southern India to Malaysia
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
References in periodicals archive ?
SET OF WOODEN SPOON POONS POONS POON POON , S, S, SPS10 PS10, 10, 10 TE T S ESE CO DIRECT
And you immediately realize that's what Larry Poons is talking about when he discusses his early days in New York.
POONS & CO 27 Lisle Street, WC2 (0171 437 4549) Leicester Square tube.
Spanning five decades of American art, the Greenberg collection begins with early works, such as a Pollock drawing, and continues through the movement Greenberg titled "post-painterly abstraction," represented by works by Walter Darby Bannard, Darryl Hughto, Larry Poons and others.
In that same March issue, Fried wrote on Larry Poons, while an ad on page four announced a show of Greenberg favorites Caro, Olitski, Dzubas, Noland, et al.
For many, the name Larry Poons will never signify anything but his classic dot paintings of the early '60s.
Indeed, looking at this book, I began to wonder whether Kahn is, in fact, a landscape painter, or more of a Color Field artist in the tradition of Larry Poons or Jules Olitski.
One assumes that he had been impressed by the vibrant color and formal clarity of the work of artists like Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland - and perhaps the dot paintings of Larry Poons as well - but there are some fundamental differences.
Recently, a spate of East Coast exhibitions focusing on the work of Caro, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Larry Poons provided an opportunity to take another look at this singularly maligned movement.
Not to mention that Larry Poons was making remarkable drip paintings around 1970, underrated works for which Steir's paintings look rather like warm-up exercises.