poop


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poop 1

 (po͞op)
n.
1. An enclosed superstructure at the stern of a ship.
2. A poop deck.
tr.v. pooped, poop·ing, poops
1. To break over the stern of (a ship). Used of a wave.
2. To take (a wave) over the stern.

[Middle English poupe, from Old French, from Latin puppis.]

poop 2

 (po͞op)
tr.v. pooped, poop·ing, poops Slang
To cause to become fatigued; tire: "Many people stop here, pooped by the short, steep climb" (Sierra Club Guides to the National Parks).
Phrasal Verb:
poop out Slang
1. To quit because of exhaustion: poop out of a race.
2. To decide not to participate, especially at the last moment.

[Origin unknown.]

poop 3

 (po͞op)
n. Slang
Inside information: She gave me all the poop on the company party.

[Origin unknown.]

poop 4

 (po͞op)
n. Slang
A person regarded as very disagreeable.

[Perhaps short for nincompoop.]

poop 5

 (po͞op) Informal
n.
Excrement.
intr.v. pooped, poop·ing, poops
v.intr.
To defecate.
v.tr.
To defecate in (one's clothes or bed, for example).

[Possibly from obsolete poop, to break wind, from Middle English poupen, to blow a horn, toot, of imitative origin.]

poop

(puːp) nautical
n
(Nautical Terms) a raised structure at the stern of a vessel, esp a sailing ship
vb
1. (Nautical Terms) (tr) (of a wave or sea) to break over the stern of (a vessel)
2. (Nautical Terms) (intr) (of a vessel) to ship a wave or sea over the stern, esp repeatedly
[C15: from Old French pupe, from Latin puppis poop, ship's stern]

poop

(puːp)
vb
1. (tr; usually passive) to cause to become exhausted; tire: he was pooped after the race.
2. (usually foll by: out) to give up or fail, esp through tiredness: he pooped out of the race.
[C14 poupen to blow, make a sudden sound, perhaps of imitative origin]

poop

(puːp)
n
slang
a. information; the facts
b. (as modifier): a poop sheet.
[of unknown origin]

poop

(puːp)
vb (intr)
to defecate
n
faeces; excrement
[perhaps related to poop2]

poop1

(pup)

n.
1. a superstructure at the stern of a vessel.
v.t.
3. (of a wave) to break over the stern of (a ship).
4. to take (seas) over the stern.
[1375–1425; pouppe < Middle French < Latin puppis stern]

poop2

(pup)

v.t. Informal.
1. to cause to become out of breath or exhausted: pooped after the long hike.
2. poop out,
a. to become exhausted.
b. to give up or cease to participate.
c. to break down; stop functioning.
[1885–90; perhaps to be identified with poop4]

poop3

(pup)

n. Slang.
a candid or pertinent factual report; low-down.
[1945–50; appar. extracted from poop sheet fact sheet; compare poop4]

poop4

(pup)

n. Slang.
1. feces; excrement.
v.i.
2. to defecate.
[1735–45; earlier “to break wind,” probably the same word as Middle English powpen, popen to sound or blow a horn; uncertain if poop2, poop3 are sense developments or parallel expressive coinages]

poop5

(pup)

n. Slang.
a nincompoop.
[1910–15]

poop

- Once had the meaning "to make an abrupt sound, as from a wind instrument."
See also related terms for wind instrument.

poop


Past participle: pooped
Gerund: pooping

Imperative
poop
poop
Present
I poop
you poop
he/she/it poops
we poop
you poop
they poop
Preterite
I pooped
you pooped
he/she/it pooped
we pooped
you pooped
they pooped
Present Continuous
I am pooping
you are pooping
he/she/it is pooping
we are pooping
you are pooping
they are pooping
Present Perfect
I have pooped
you have pooped
he/she/it has pooped
we have pooped
you have pooped
they have pooped
Past Continuous
I was pooping
you were pooping
he/she/it was pooping
we were pooping
you were pooping
they were pooping
Past Perfect
I had pooped
you had pooped
he/she/it had pooped
we had pooped
you had pooped
they had pooped
Future
I will poop
you will poop
he/she/it will poop
we will poop
you will poop
they will poop
Future Perfect
I will have pooped
you will have pooped
he/she/it will have pooped
we will have pooped
you will have pooped
they will have pooped
Future Continuous
I will be pooping
you will be pooping
he/she/it will be pooping
we will be pooping
you will be pooping
they will be pooping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pooping
you have been pooping
he/she/it has been pooping
we have been pooping
you have been pooping
they have been pooping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pooping
you will have been pooping
he/she/it will have been pooping
we will have been pooping
you will have been pooping
they will have been pooping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pooping
you had been pooping
he/she/it had been pooping
we had been pooping
you had been pooping
they had been pooping
Conditional
I would poop
you would poop
he/she/it would poop
we would poop
you would poop
they would poop
Past Conditional
I would have pooped
you would have pooped
he/she/it would have pooped
we would have pooped
you would have pooped
they would have pooped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poop - obscene terms for fecespoop - obscene terms for feces    
dirty word, vulgarism, obscenity, smut, filth - an offensive or indecent word or phrase
faecal matter, faeces, fecal matter, feces, ordure, BM, dejection, stool - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels
2.poop - a stupid foolish person
simpleton, simple - a person lacking intelligence or common sense
3.poop - slang terms for inside information; "is that the straight dope?"
details, inside information - true confidential information; "after the trial he gave us the real details"
4.poop - the rear part of a shippoop - the rear part of a ship    
escutcheon - (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed
back, rear - the side that goes last or is not normally seen; "he wrote the date on the back of the photograph"
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
skeg - a brace that extends from the rear of the keel to support the rudderpost

poop 1

verb
Slang. To make extremely tired.Also used with out:
Informal: knock out, tucker (out).
Slang: do in.
Idioms: run ragged, take it out of.
phrasal verb
poop out
Slang. To lose so much strength and power as to become ineffective or motionless:

poop 2

noun
Slang. An unpleasant, tiresome person:
Slang: drip, dweeb, jerk, nerd, pill.
Translations

poop

1 [puːp] (Naut)
A. Npopa f
B. CPD poop deck Ntoldilla f, castillo m de popa

poop

2 [puːp] N (= excrement) → caca f

poop

3 [puːp] N (US) (= information) → onda f, información f

poop

[ˈpuːp] npoupe f

poop

1
nHütte f, → Poop f

poop

2
vt (inf: = exhaust) → schlauchen (inf); to be pooped (out)geschlaucht or fertig sein (inf)

poop

3
n (US inf, pej) → Trottel m (pej), → Einfaltspinsel f (pej)

poop

4
vi (inf: = defecate) → ein großes Geschäft machen (inf), → Aa machen (baby-talk)

poop

n (fam) heces fpl (form), popó (fam), caca (esp. ped, fam or vulg)
References in classic literature ?
The son of Barbarossa was so cruel, and treated his slaves so badly, that, when those who were at the oars saw that the She-wolf galley was bearing down upon them and gaining upon them, they all at once dropped their oars and seized their captain who stood on the stage at the end of the gangway shouting to them to row lustily; and passing him on from bench to bench, from the poop to the prow, they so bit him that before he had got much past the mast his soul had already got to hell; so great, as I said, was the cruelty with which he treated them, and the hatred with which they hated him.
One of the sailors conducted me to the poop, where I found myself in the presence of a good-looking officer, who held out his hand to me.
He went to the poop, saying to himself, "He will be like a madman
Fasten it to the poop with a rope; put the oars into it, so that it may follow in the track and there will be nothing to do except to cut the cord.
He walks the poop darting gloomy glances, as though he wished to poison the sea, and snaps your head off savagely whenever you happen to blunder within earshot.
And there were also disturbing sounds by this time--voices, footsteps for- ward; the steward flitted along the main-deck, a busily ministering spirit; a hand bell tinkled urgently under the poop deck.
But," exclaimed De Guiche, "look, De Wardes -- look, Manicamp -- look yonder, the princesses are looking at us from the poop of the admiral's vessel.
In his indignation at what he termed their effeminacy, he would swear that he would never take them to sea again "without having Fly-market on the forecastle, Covent-garden on the poop, and a cool spring from Canada in the maintop.
Out we ran, and there on the poop were the lieutenent and ten of his men.
I remember her telling me that she had not yet come out, the very first time I assisted her to promenade the poop.
These lighters, in the shape of gondolas, somewhat wide and heavy, containing a small chamber, covered by the deck, and a chamber in the poop, formed by a tent, then acted as passage-boats from Orleans to Nantes, by the Loire, and this passage, a long one in our days, appeared then more easy and convenient than the high-road, with its post-hacks and its ill-hung carriages.
Dry and spare, as lean as a jockey and as tough as whipcord, he might be seen any day swinging his silver-headed Malacca cane, and pacing along the suburban roads with the same measured gait with which he had been wont to tread the poop of his flagship.