poorness


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poor

 (po͝or)
adj. poor·er, poor·est
1.
a. Having insufficient wealth to meet the necessities or comforts of life or to live in a manner considered acceptable in a society.
b. Relating to or characterized by poverty: the poor side of town.
2. Deficient or lacking in a specified resource or quality: an area poor in timber and coal; a diet poor in calcium.
3. Not adequate in quality or quantity; inferior: a poor performance; poor wages.
4. Negative, unfavorable, or disapproving: has a poor opinion of the mayor.
5. Undernourished; lean. Used especially of animals.
6. Humble; meek: "Let the humble ones arise, the poor in heart be glad" (John Greenleaf Whittier).
7. Eliciting or deserving pity; pitiable: couldn't rescue the poor fellow.
n. (used with a pl. verb)
Poor people considered as a group: The urban poor are in need of homes.

[Middle English poure, from Old French povre, from Latin pauper; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

poor′ness n.
Usage Note: In informal speech poor is sometimes used as an adverb, as in They never played poorer. In formal usage more poorly would be required in this example.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poorness - the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessionspoorness - the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions
financial condition - the condition of (corporate or personal) finances
deprivation, neediness, privation, want - a state of extreme poverty
destitution - a state without friends or money or prospects
indigence, pauperism, pauperization, penury, need - a state of extreme poverty or destitution; "their indigence appalled him"; "a general state of need exists among the homeless"
impecuniousness, pennilessness, penuriousness - a state of lacking money
2.poorness - less than adequate; "the relative poorness of New England farmland"
aridity, barrenness, fruitlessness - the quality of yielding nothing of value
3.poorness - the quality of being meagerpoorness - the quality of being meager; "an exiguity of cloth that would only allow of miniature capes"-George Eliot
inadequacy, deficiency, insufficiency - lack of an adequate quantity or number; "the inadequacy of unemployment benefits"
wateriness - meagerness or poorness connoted by a superfluity of water (in a literary style as well as in a food); "the haziness and wateriness of his disquisitions"; "the wateriness of his blood"; "no one enjoys the burning of his soup or the wateriness of his potatoes"
abstemiousness - restricted to bare necessities
spareness, sparseness, sparsity, thinness - the property of being scanty or scattered; lacking denseness
4.poorness - the quality of being poorly made or maintained; "she was unrecognizable because of the poorness of the photography"
low quality, inferiority - an inferior quality
Translations
بُؤْس ، فَقْر
chudoba
fattigdom
fátækt

poorness

[ˈpʊənɪs] N
1. (= poverty) → pobreza f
2. (= poor quality) → mala calidad f
poorness of spiritapocamiento m, mezquindad f

poorness

n
(= lack of money)Armut f
(= lack of quality)Dürftigkeit f, → Mangelhaftigkeit f; (of soil)Magerkeit f, → Unergiebigkeit f; (of effort, excuse, harvest, performance)Dürftigkeit f; (of quality)Minderwertigkeit f; (of weather, memory, health, eyesight)Unzulänglichkeit f; (of leadership)Schwäche f

poorness

[ˈpʊənɪs] n (lack of wealth) → povertà; (of crop, light) → scarsità; (of effort, excuse, accommodation) → insufficienza, inadeguatezza; (of health) → debolezza

poor

(puə) adjective
1. having little money or property. She is too poor to buy clothes for the children; the poor nations of the world.
2. not good; of bad quality. His work is very poor; a poor effort.
3. deserving pity. Poor fellow!
ˈpoorness noun
ˈpoorly adverb
not well; badly. a poorly written essay.
adjective
ill. He is very poorly.
References in classic literature ?
which indeed are arts of state, and arts of life, as Tacitus well calleth them), to him, a habit of dissimulation is a hinderance and a poorness.
I am taught the poorness of our invention, the ugliness of towns and palaces.
On the absence of intermediate varieties at the present day -- On the nature of extinct intermediate varieties; on their number -- On the vast lapse of time, as inferred from the rate of deposition and of denudation -- On the poorness of our palaeontological collections -- On the intermittence of geological formations -- On the absence of intermediate varieties in any one formation -- On the sudden appearance of groups of species -- On their sudden appearance in the lowest known fossiliferous strata.
This poorness of the vegetation is owing to the quantity of saline matter with which the soil is impregnated.
But whether so or not, I was put in youth to a very genteel boarding-school, the mistress being no less a lady than yourself, of about your own age or it may be some years younger, and a poorness of blood flowed from the table which has run through my life.
If you refer, then, to the poorness of your blood--'
Because of this poorness in comprehension, Gilson voices the suspicion that we would need "an intuition of [being]" or an "intellectual intuition of being as being" in order to get at it at all, yet he notes that such an intuition would be inarticulable and thus would remain inconceivable.