pooh

(redirected from poos)
Also found in: Acronyms, Idioms.

pooh

 (po͞o)
interj.
Used to express disdain or disbelief.

pooh

(puː) ,

pugh

or

puh

interj
an exclamation of disdain, contempt, or disgust
n
a childish word for faeces
vb
a childish word for defecate

pooh

(pu, pʊ)

interj.
1. (used as an exclamation of disdain or contempt.)
n.
2. an exclamation of “pooh.”
[1595–1605]
Translations

pooh

[puː]
A. EXCL¡bah!
B. N & VT & VI = poo

pooh

interj (bad smell) → puh, pfui; (disdain) → pah, bah
n (baby-talk)Aa nt (baby-talk); to do a poohAa machen (baby-talk)
vi (baby-talk)Aa machen (baby-talk)

pooh

[puː] exclpuah!
References in classic literature ?
Such appeared, indeed, to be the case, for in a little while a courier arrived at the 'Ti', almost breathless with his exertions, and communicated the news of a great victory having been achieved by his countrymen: 'Happar poo arva
A museum dedicated to poo, with real-life examples from the animal and human world, has opened to the public, the UK's Press Association reported on Sunday.
The National Poo Museum has been created by members of the artist collective Eccleston George.
The site tracks how many poos have been spotted, when and where they were spotted, and also calculates the revenue that could be made from fines.
Apparently men go round Paris with freezer packs on their backs which they use to freeze the poo and then vacuum it up.
The poos are very realistic and we think the children will really enjoy squeezing them before they throw them at the toilets.
He Poos Clouds whips pizzicato strings, snare drums, woodwinds, and his light but affecting tenor into deceptively complex yet frothy-sounding pop concoctions, all inspired by being the butt of many a mean-spirited teen-movie joke.
Walking down Haymans Green was like walking through a doggy poo minefield.
Of course, "Essex was not England," as Poos repeatedly reminds us, and late medieval Essex was not early modern East Anglia, even if affinities existed.
Poos published earlier his calculations of the Essex population in the later middle ages, concluding that there had been severe mortality during the agrarian crisis of 1315-17 and the Black Death, then another decline, and stagnation thereafter; at the beginning of the sixteenth century the local population was "well under one-half the level it had achieved two centuries earlier" (Econ.