popery


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Related to popery: Papism

pop·er·y

 (pō′pə-rē)
n. Offensive
The doctrines, practices, and rituals of the Roman Catholic Church.

popery

(ˈpəʊpərɪ)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a derogatory name for Roman Catholicism

pop•er•y

(ˈpoʊ pə ri)

n.
usage: This term is used by Protestants to show contempt for Roman Catholic practices and tenets.
n.
Disparaging. Roman Catholicism.
[1525–35]

popery

Derogatory & Offensive. Roman Catholicism.
See also: Pope
Pejorative. papal authority or actions.
See also: Catholicism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.popery - offensive terms for the practices and rituals of the Roman Catholic Church
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations

popery

[ˈpəʊpərɪ] N (pej) → papismo m
no popery!¡abajo el papa!, ¡papa no!

popery

n (pej)Pfaffentum nt; no popery!Pfaffen raus!

popery

[ˈpəʊpərɪ] n (pej) → papismo
References in classic literature ?
For my own part, I had been for some time very seriously affected with the danger to which the Protestant religion was so visibly exposed under a Popish prince, and thought the apprehension of it alone sufficient to justify that insurrection; for no real security can ever be found against the persecuting spirit of Popery, when armed with power, except the depriving it of that power, as woeful experience presently showed.
preach against popery, and bishops were ordered to supend those who
and constant machinations of Popery, a preservation so strange and
In this retirement--a Patmos amid the howling ocean of popery that surrounds us--a letter from England has reached me at last.
I'm not exactly a Protestant, and I'm not a Catholic, but I could almost pray for the days of popery to come again-- because of the fasts.
They do not possess our blessings and advantages, and they are, for the most part, brought up in the blind errors of Popery.
the Italians], in a prominent degree, the execution of some of his greatest designs, and the fulfilment of some of the most glorious prophesies and promises recorded in the Bible, especially in overturning popery.
Like William Pitt, the Catholic polemicist John Milner asked rhetorically if it was "from the side of Popery, or from the opposite quarter of Jacobinism, that the Established Church is in most danger at the present day" (qtd.
Thus fasting, "like so many other aspects of Protestant devotional life, opened cracks through which popery could step back into the sterile ritual spaces which Protestant doctrine implied" (108).
The answer, Taylor argues, was the revolution's resolution of the two main sources of political instability: the fear over the misuse of the royal prerogative and the threat that popery posed to the Church and the state.
In 1770, the Society for the Propagation of Christian Knowledge was set up to administer schools in the Highlands and to "combat the ignorance, atheism, popery and impiety of the Highlands".
During the 16th Century Queen Elizabeth I gave much support and assistance to the Low Countries in their long war for freedom against the tyranny and popery of the Spanish crown.