populace


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pop·u·lace

 (pŏp′yə-lĭs)
n.
1. The general public; the masses.
2. A population.

[French, from Italian popolaccio, rabble, from popolo, the people, from Latin populus; see popular.]

populace

(ˈpɒpjʊləs)
n (sometimes functioning as plural)
1. the inhabitants of an area
2. the common people; masses
[C16: via French from Italian popolaccio the common herd, from popolo people, from Latin populus]

pop•u•lace

(ˈpɒp yə ləs)

n.
1. (in a community or nation) the common people as distinguished from the higher classes.
2. the inhabitants of a place; population.
[1565–75; < French < Italian popolaccio=popol(o) people + -accio pejorative suffix]

Populace

 the majority; the common people, 1572; the multitude, crowd or throng, 1871. See also mob.
Example: rural populace (the birds of the country), 1807.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.populace - people in general considered as a wholepopulace - people in general considered as a whole; "he is a hero in the eyes of the public"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
admass - the segment of the public that is easily influenced by mass media (chiefly British)
audience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainment; "every artist needs an audience"; "the broadcast reached an audience of millions"

populace

noun people, crowd, masses, mob, inhabitants, general public, multitude, throng, rabble, hoi polloi, Joe Public (slang), Joe Six-Pack (U.S. slang), commonalty a large proportion of the populace

populace

noun
The common people:
common (used in plural), commonality, commonalty, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), public, ruck, third estate.
Translations
عامَّة الناس او الجُمْهور
obyvatelstvo
befolkning
almúgi
gyventojai
iedzīvotājiļaudis

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] N (gen) → pueblo m; (= mob) → populacho m, turba f

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] n
the populace → le peuple

populace

nBevölkerung f; (= masses)breite Öffentlichkeit; the populace of Romedas Volk von Rom, die Bürger von Rom

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] npopolo, popolino

populace

(ˈpopjuləs) noun
the people (of a country etc).
References in classic literature ?
In the corner to the left are the three musicians, upon a little platform, toiling heroically to make some impression upon the hubbub; also the babies, similarly occupied, and an open window whence the populace imbibes the sights and sounds and odors.
When I started to the chapel, the populace un- covered and fell back reverently to make a wide way for me, as if I had been some kind of a superior being -- and I was.
We were as much heroes as anybody else, except Peter, and were so recognized; we were taken with Peter and the populace to Peter's mother's cottage, and there we ate bread and cheese, and drank milk and beer with everybody, and had a most sociable good time; and when we left we had a handshake all around, and were receiving and shouting back LEB' WOHL's until a turn in the road separated us from our cordial and kindly new friends forever.
Deeming that a serene and unconscious contemplation of him would best beseem me, and would be most likely to quell his evil mind, I advanced with that expression of countenance, and was rather congratulating myself on my success, when suddenly the knees of Trabb's boy smote together, his hair uprose, his cap fell off, he trembled violently in every limb, staggered out into the road, and crying to the populace, "Hold me
But on that which was to follow, feats of archery, of bull-baiting, and other popular amusements, were to be practised, for the more immediate amusement of the populace.
We found, however, a more unpleasing treatment at the next place, and had certainly ended our lives there had we not been protected by the governor and the priest, who, though not reconciled to the Roman Church, yet showed us the utmost civility; the governor informed us of a design against our lives, and advised us not to go out after sunset, and gave us guards to protect us from the insults of the populace.
All the gentry and populace of the surrounding country were gathered there in eager expectancy.
It seemed as though the Priests had no choice between submission and extermination; when suddenly the course of events was completely changed by one of those picturesque incidents which Statesmen ought never to neglect, often to anticipate, and sometimes perhaps to originate, because of the absurdly disproportionate power with which they appeal to the sympathies of the populace.
That my poor services to Dejah Thoris had become known to the Heliumites was evidenced by the loud crying of my name, and by the loads of ornaments that were fastened upon me and my huge thoat as we passed up the avenues to the palace, for even in the face of the ferocious appearance of Woola the populace pressed close about me.
s half-filled snuff-box, -- scarcely had this occurred when Marseilles began, in spite of the authorities, to rekindle the flames of civil war, always smouldering in the south, and it required but little to excite the populace to acts of far greater violence than the shouts and insults with which they assailed the royalists whenever they ventured abroad.
The queen will never banish me, and even were I obliged to yield to the populace she would yield with me; if I fly, she will fly; and then we shall see how the rebels will get on without either king or queen.
The pedlar meditated with much fervor on the charms of the young schoolmistress, and swore that Daniel Webster never spoke nor looked so like an angel as Miss Higginbotham, while defending him from the wrathful populace at Parker's Falls.