populace


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pop·u·lace

 (pŏp′yə-lĭs)
n.
1. The general public; the masses.
2. A population.

[French, from Italian popolaccio, rabble, from popolo, the people, from Latin populus; see popular.]

populace

(ˈpɒpjʊləs)
n (sometimes functioning as plural)
1. the inhabitants of an area
2. the common people; masses
[C16: via French from Italian popolaccio the common herd, from popolo people, from Latin populus]

pop•u•lace

(ˈpɒp yə ləs)

n.
1. (in a community or nation) the common people as distinguished from the higher classes.
2. the inhabitants of a place; population.
[1565–75; < French < Italian popolaccio=popol(o) people + -accio pejorative suffix]

Populace

 the majority; the common people, 1572; the multitude, crowd or throng, 1871. See also mob.
Example: rural populace (the birds of the country), 1807.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.populace - people in general considered as a wholepopulace - people in general considered as a whole; "he is a hero in the eyes of the public"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
admass - the segment of the public that is easily influenced by mass media (chiefly British)
audience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainment; "every artist needs an audience"; "the broadcast reached an audience of millions"

populace

noun people, crowd, masses, mob, inhabitants, general public, multitude, throng, rabble, hoi polloi, Joe Public (slang), Joe Six-Pack (U.S. slang), commonalty a large proportion of the populace

populace

noun
The common people:
common (used in plural), commonality, commonalty, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), public, ruck, third estate.
Translations
عامَّة الناس او الجُمْهور
obyvatelstvo
befolkning
almúgi
gyventojai
iedzīvotājiļaudis

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] N (gen) → pueblo m; (= mob) → populacho m, turba f

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] n
the populace → le peuple

populace

nBevölkerung f; (= masses)breite Öffentlichkeit; the populace of Romedas Volk von Rom, die Bürger von Rom

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] npopolo, popolino

populace

(ˈpopjuləs) noun
the people (of a country etc).
References in classic literature ?
The lowest, cruelest, and worst populace of a city, never without its quantity of low, cruel, and bad, were the directing spirits of the scene: noisily commenting, applauding, disapproving, anticipating, and precipitating the result, without a check.
His high personal popularity, and the clearness of his answers, made a great impression; but, as he proceeded, as he showed that the Accused was his first friend on his release from his long imprisonment; that, the accused had remained in England, always faithful and devoted to his daughter and himself in their exile; that, so far from being in favour with the Aristocrat government there, he had actually been tried for his life by it, as the foe of England and friend of the United States--as he brought these circumstances into view, with the greatest discretion and with the straightforward force of truth and earnestness, the Jury and the populace became one.
The priest whitewashes them, the archdeacon scrapes them down; then the populace arrives and demolishes them.
Once spirit was God, then it became man, and now it even becometh populace.
The marshal was ordinarily very adventurous and was wont to hesitate at nothing; and he had that lofty contempt for the populace which army officers usually profess.
The populace had come to witness an execution, and here was an opportunity offered them of performing one themselves.
Solon seems not to have altered the established form of government, either with respect to the senate or the mode of electing their magistrates; but to have raised the people to great consideration in the state by allotting the supreme judicial department to them; and for this some persons blame him, as having done what would soon overturn that balance of power he intended to establish; for by trying all causes whatsoever before the people, who were chosen by lot to determine them, it was necessary to flatter a tyrannical populace who had got this power; which contributed to bring the government to that pure democracy it now is.
But the populace, seeing in that title an allusion damaging to Barbicane's project, broke into the auditorium, smashed the benches, and compelled the unlucky director to alter his playbill.
It seemed as though the Priests had no choice between submission and extermination; when suddenly the course of events was completely changed by one of those picturesque incidents which Statesmen ought never to neglect, often to anticipate, and sometimes perhaps to originate, because of the absurdly disproportionate power with which they appeal to the sympathies of the populace.
We sauntered through the markets and criticised the fearful and wonderful costumes from the back country; examined the populace as far as eyes could do it; and closed the entertainment with an ice-cream debauch.
The greatest portion, however -- those especially who belabor the populace with clubs -- are the principal courtiers of the palace, executing as in duty bound, some laudable comicality of the king's.
The populace are hailing him 'Prince of Poets,' as well as 'Glory of the East,' 'Delight of the Universe,' and 'Most Remarkable of Cameleopards.