populace

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pop·u·lace

 (pŏp′yə-lĭs)
n.
1. The general public; the masses.
2. A population.

[French, from Italian popolaccio, rabble, from popolo, the people, from Latin populus; see popular.]

populace

(ˈpɒpjʊləs)
n (sometimes functioning as plural)
1. the inhabitants of an area
2. the common people; masses
[C16: via French from Italian popolaccio the common herd, from popolo people, from Latin populus]

pop•u•lace

(ˈpɒp yə ləs)

n.
1. (in a community or nation) the common people as distinguished from the higher classes.
2. the inhabitants of a place; population.
[1565–75; < French < Italian popolaccio=popol(o) people + -accio pejorative suffix]

Populace

 the majority; the common people, 1572; the multitude, crowd or throng, 1871. See also mob.
Example: rural populace (the birds of the country), 1807.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.populace - people in general considered as a wholepopulace - people in general considered as a whole; "he is a hero in the eyes of the public"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
admass - the segment of the public that is easily influenced by mass media (chiefly British)
audience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainment; "every artist needs an audience"; "the broadcast reached an audience of millions"

populace

noun people, crowd, masses, mob, inhabitants, general public, multitude, throng, rabble, hoi polloi, Joe Public (slang), Joe Six-Pack (U.S. slang), commonalty a large proportion of the populace

populace

noun
The common people:
common (used in plural), commonality, commonalty, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), public, ruck, third estate.
Translations
عامَّة الناس او الجُمْهور
obyvatelstvo
befolkning
almúgi
gyventojai
iedzīvotājiļaudis

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] N (gen) → pueblo m; (= mob) → populacho m, turba f

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊləs] n
the populace → le peuple

populace

nBevölkerung f; (= masses)breite Öffentlichkeit; the populace of Romedas Volk von Rom, die Bürger von Rom

populace

[ˈpɒpjʊlɪs] npopolo, popolino

populace

(ˈpopjuləs) noun
the people (of a country etc).
References in classic literature ?
The populace was an ever flocking and drifting swarm of rags, and splendors, of nodding plumes and shining armor.
It seemed as though the Priests had no choice between submission and extermination; when suddenly the course of events was completely changed by one of those picturesque incidents which Statesmen ought never to neglect, often to anticipate, and sometimes perhaps to originate, because of the absurdly disproportionate power with which they appeal to the sympathies of the populace.
That my poor services to Dejah Thoris had become known to the Heliumites was evidenced by the loud crying of my name, and by the loads of ornaments that were fastened upon me and my huge thoat as we passed up the avenues to the palace, for even in the face of the ferocious appearance of Woola the populace pressed close about me.
The marshal was ordinarily very adventurous and was wont to hesitate at nothing; and he had that lofty contempt for the populace which army officers usually profess.
The populace had come to witness an execution, and here was an opportunity offered them of performing one themselves.
Such were some of the motley populace of the wilderness, incident to the fur trade, who were gradually attracted to the new settlement of Astoria.
The greatest portion, however -- those especially who belabor the populace with clubs -- are the principal courtiers of the palace, executing as in duty bound, some laudable comicality of the king's.
The street was a narrow and long one, and his course lay within it for nearly an hour, during which the passengers had gradually diminished to about that number which is ordinarily seen at noon in Broadway near the Park - so vast a difference is there between a London populace and that of the most frequented American city.
The populace had been supposed to be disarmed ever since the suppression of the revolt, but Otto now insisted, as governments very seldom insist, on an absolute and literal disarmament.
Solon seems not to have altered the established form of government, either with respect to the senate or the mode of electing their magistrates; but to have raised the people to great consideration in the state by allotting the supreme judicial department to them; and for this some persons blame him, as having done what would soon overturn that balance of power he intended to establish; for by trying all causes whatsoever before the people, who were chosen by lot to determine them, it was necessary to flatter a tyrannical populace who had got this power; which contributed to bring the government to that pure democracy it now is.
We sauntered through the markets and criticised the fearful and wonderful costumes from the back country; examined the populace as far as eyes could do it; and closed the entertainment with an ice-cream debauch.