popular front

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popular front

n.
A political coalition of leftist parties against fascism, such as that formed among European countries during the 1930s.

popular front

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often capital) any of the left-wing groups or parties that were organized from 1935 onwards to oppose the spread of fascism

pop′ular front′


n.
a coalition, usu. temporary, of leftist and sometimes centrist political parties, formed against a common opponent, as fascism.
[1935–40; compare Sp. frente popular, French front populaire]

popular front

A coalition of leftist political groups, especially any of those formed in Europe in the 1930s to oppose Fascism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.popular front - a leftist coalition organized against a common opponent
alignment, alinement, coalition, alliance - an organization of people (or countries) involved in a pact or treaty
Translations

popular front

nVolksfront f
References in periodicals archive ?
10) It was therefore in the interests of Communists not to build international proletarian revolutionary networks but nationally grounded popular fronts alliances of likeminded anti-fascists of various political allegiances--to defend the structures of national bourgeois democracy and resist fascism's 'preparatory stages'.
The conclusion sketches in the contested legacies of Rickword and Lindsay's interventions--which staked a claim on the nation's future through the radical cultural and political traditions of its past--beyond the popular front period.
In terms of the Communist Party, the popular front years (1935-39) were preceded by the so called 'class against class period' (1928-35) in which the Communist International had optimistically detected in global economic crisis a fresh period of revolutionary opportunity.
The international comparisons in this collection are particularly rich: Marie-Claude Chaput compares the popular fronts in Spain and Chile; Maurice Carrez examines the experience in Scandinavia and Finland; Eric Vial studies the Popular Union established by the Italian communists in exile; and Alain Ruscio discusses the popular front's impact in Vietnam.
The Popular Front represents a founding moment in the history of the French communist party--the point at which the party emerged as a serious electoral force, secured the adhesion of millions of workers radicalised by the mass strike movement, and forged an identity fusing loyalty to the Soviet Union with the French national tradition.
She also demonstrates that the popular classes enthusiastically supported the popular fronts, another point that scholars have failed to recognize.
Therefore, they were entitled to certain rights as members of the productive class, rights that the popular fronts pledged to defend.
With a new preface the author (a professor of English and American studies at Purdue University) updates his reappraisal of a critical moment in American cultural history to engage the reassessments of the politics of Richard Wright's critical reputation and a provocative reading of class struggle in Gwendolyn Brooks' A Street in Bronzeville (1945), and a look at the institutions that comprised Chicago's Black popular front such as the Chicago Defender, the period's leading Black newspaper; Negro Story, the first magazine devoted to publishing short stories by and about African Americans; and the WPA-sponsored South Side Community Art Center.
In April 1937, anticolonial activists from throughout France's overseas empire met in Paris to form the Rassemblement Colonial, described by one of its founders as "a Popular Front for the colonies.
3] In other words, the elements united in the Colonial Popular Front viewed themselves as participating in the struggles unfolding in Europe during the late 1930s and presented themselves as natural allies of the leftist government in Paris.
Beginning his story with the platform of the Communist Party-sponsored 1936 National Negro Congress, Mullen argues that, contrary to most narratives that end the Popular Front in 1939, scrutiny of the Chicago Negro People's Front requires that we abandon the notion that Harlem remained the center of African-American cultural activity and that we reconfigure the dating of the Popular Front so that it extends past the end of World War II: 1940s Chicago, he shows, is where much of the red-black action was.
Michael Denning's highly touted Cultural Front, while valuable for its encyclopedic--and largely unjaundiced--survey of left-influenced artistic and discursive practices during the conventionally demarcated era of the Popular Front, tends to minimize the role played by the organized left and to view the period's culture as relatively autonomous from its material base, almost indeed to the point of absolute autonomy.

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