porch


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porch

 (pôrch)
n.
1. A covered platform, usually having a separate roof, at an entrance to a building.
2. An open or enclosed gallery or room attached to the outside of a building; a veranda.
3. Obsolete A portico or covered walk.

[Middle English porche, from Old French, from Latin porticus, portico, from porta, gate; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

porch

(pɔːtʃ)
n
1. (Architecture) a low structure projecting from the doorway of a house and forming a covered entrance
2. (Architecture) US and Canadian an exterior roofed gallery, often partly enclosed; veranda
[C13: from French porche, from Latin porticus portico]

porch

(pɔrtʃ, poʊrtʃ)

n.
1. an exterior appendage to a building, forming a covered approach or vestibule to a doorway.
2. a veranda.
3. Obs. a portico.
[1250–1300; Middle English porche < Old French < Latin porticus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entranceporch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
back porch - a porch for the back door
deck - a porch that resembles the deck on a ship
front porch - a porch for the front door
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
portico - a porch or entrance to a building consisting of a covered and often columned area
stoep, stoop - small porch or set of steps at the front entrance of a house
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
veranda, verandah, gallery - a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)

porch

noun vestibule, hall, entry, lobby, entrance, foyer, portal, entrance hall, portico She stood framed in the doorway of the porch.
Translations
رُوَاقشُرْفَه، برندامَدْخَل خارِجي مَسْقوف
krytý vchodveranda
vindfangveranda
kuisti
trijem
veröndyfirbyggîur inngangur
ポーチ
현관
priebutispriemenėveranda
lievenisveranda
krytý vchod
verandavetrolov
veranda
ชานบ้าน
verandasundurma
cổng vòm

porch

[pɔːtʃ] N [of church] → pórtico m; [of house] → porche m, portal m (US) (= veranda) → porche m, terraza f

porch

[ˈpɔːrtʃ] n
(= entrance) [house, church] → porche m
(US) (= veranda) → véranda f

porch

n (of house)Vorbau m, → Vordach nt; (US) → Veranda f; (of church)Vorhalle f, → Portal nt

porch

[pɔːtʃ] nveranda; (of church) → sagrato

porch

(poːtʃ) noun
1. a covered entrance to a building. They waited in the porch until it stopped raining.
2. a veranda.

porch

رُوَاق krytý vchod vindfang Vorbau βεράντα πρόσοψης porche kuisti entrée trijem veranda ポーチ 현관 veranda vindfang ganek varanda крыльцо veranda ชานบ้าน veranda cổng vòm 门廊
References in classic literature ?
As twilight fell, dewy and still, one by one they gathered on the porch where the June roses were budding beautifully, and each groaned or sighed as she sat down, as if tired or troubled.
For a moment he stood thus, rubbing his hands together and looking up and down the road, and then, fear overcoming him, ran back to walk again upon the porch on his own house.
A little later the trim and speedy car drew up in front of the Nestor home, and Tom bounded up on the front porch, his heart not altogether as light as his feet.
Harling with Charley and Sally on the front porch, resting after her hard drive.
When they reached the cottage, the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch, facing each other, each leaning against a supporting post.
So I walk a little in the garden or down that lovely lane, sit on the porch under the roses, and lie down up here a good deal.
The principal entrance, which had almost the breadth of a church-door, was in the angle between the two front gables, and was covered by an open porch, with benches beneath its shelter.
Benches were built along the sides for summer use; and a great spinning-wheel at one end, and a churn at the other, showed the various uses to which this important porch might be devoted.
It had a careless look, as if it were meant for the uses of the public; so, entering, the first thing I did was to stumble over an ash-box in the porch.
Her home was unthinkably filthy; you could not enter by the front door at all, owing to the mattresses, and when you tried to go up the backstairs you found that she had walled up most of the porch with old boards to make a place to keep her chickens.
Old Bruno, a great Newfoundland, who slept at the end of the porch, rose, with a low growl, as she came near.
Across the gable that fronted the road, and about ten feet above the ground, ran a narrow porch, with a wooden railing; a row of small windows filled with very small panes looked upon the porch.