porcupine


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por·cu·pine

 (pôr′kyə-pīn′)
n.
Any of various rodents of the family Hystricidae, of Eurasia and Africa, or the family Erethizontidae, of the Americas, having long, sharp, erectile quills.

[Middle English porke despine, from Old French porc espin, ultimately (perhaps via Old Italian porcospino) from Vulgar Latin *porcospīnus : Latin porcus, pig; see porko- in Indo-European roots + Latin spīna, thorn, spine (probably translation of Late Greek akanthokhoiros, hedgehog : Greek akantha, thorn + Greek khoiros, pig).]

porcupine

(ˈpɔːkjʊˌpaɪn)
n
(Animals) any of various large hystricomorph rodents of the families Hystricidae, of Africa, Indonesia, S Europe, and S Asia, and Erethizontidae, of the New World. All species have a body covering of protective spines or quills
[C14 porc despyne pig with spines, from Old French porc espin; see pork, spine]
ˈporcuˌpinish adj
ˈporcuˌpiny adj

por•cu•pine

(ˈpɔr kyəˌpaɪn)

n.
any large rodent of the New World family Erethizontidae or the Old World family Hystricidae, having stiff, sharp, erectile spines or quills.
[1375–1425; late Middle English porcupyne, porcapyne, Middle English porke despyne < Middle French porc d'espine literally, thorny pig. See pork, spine]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porcupine - relatively large rodents with sharp erectile bristles mingled with the furporcupine - relatively large rodents with sharp erectile bristles mingled with the fur
quill - a stiff hollow protective spine on a porcupine or hedgehog
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
Old World porcupine - terrestrial porcupine
New World porcupine - arboreal porcupine
Translations
شَيْهَم، نيص
dikobraz
hulepindsvin
piikkisika
dikobraz
tarajos sül
broddgöltur
dygliakiaulė
dzeloņcūka
dikobraz
ježevec
dikobraz
piggsvin
oklu kirpi

porcupine

[ˈpɔːkjʊpaɪn]
A. Npuerco m espín
B. CPD porcupine fish Npez m globo

porcupine

[ˈpɔːrkjʊpaɪn] nporc-épic m

porcupine

porcupine

[ˈpɔːkjʊˌpaɪn] nporcospino

porcupine

(ˈpoːkjupain) noun
a kind of gnawing animal covered with long prickles (called quills), and larger than a hedgehog.
References in classic literature ?
He knew the breed, though he had never met it so far north before; and never in his long life had porcupine served him for a meal.
He's different from a reg'lar porcupine, because he can throw his quills in any direction, which an American porcupine cannot do.
In this way, they hovered round him, feathering him with arrows, as he reared and plunged about, until he was bristled all over like a porcupine.
This usually consists of a gray surcoat and leggins of the dressed skin of the antelope, resembling chamois leather, and embroidered with porcupine quills brilliantly dyed.
Each distant thicket seemed a strange porcupine with quills of flame.
Well, don't make a porcupine of yourself, it isn't becoming.
He was a shortish gentleman, with very stiff black hair cut in the porcupine or blacking-brush style, and standing stiff and straight all over his head; his aspect was pompous and threatening; his manner was peremptory; his eyes were sharp and restless; and his whole bearing bespoke a feeling of great confidence in himself, and a consciousness of immeasurable superiority over all other people.
It began when the winter Rains failed almost entirely, and Ikki, the Porcupine, meeting Mowgli in a bamboo-thicket, told him that the wild yams were drying up.
He, indeed, ignorant that the still hour, a cloudless moon, and an open lattice, had revealed to me the secret of his selfish love and false friendship, would have continued smooth and complaisant as ever; but I grew spiny as a porcupine, and inflexible as a blackthorn cudgel; I never had a smile for his raillery, never a moment for his society; his invitations to take coffee with him in his parlour were invariably rejected, and very stiffly and sternly rejected too; his jesting allusions to the directress (which he still continued) were heard with a grim calm very different from the petulant pleasure they were formerly wont to excite.
She gets more and more like a porcupine every minute
It was trimmed with a twist of buff ribbon and a cluster of black and orange porcupine quills, which hung or bristled stiffly over one ear, giving her the quaintest and most unusual appearance.
Finding at last, however, that, although I had been all this time a very porcupine or hedgehog, bristling all over with determination, I had effected nothing, it began to occur to me that perhaps Dora's mind was already formed.